OSHA Citations Directory


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OSHA CITATIONS 2001       

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Here is an ongoing directory of OSHA citations from the OSHA.gov website.  Citations most recently announced are at the top.  To search for specific key words or topics (i.e. lockout, ppe, fall protection, carbon monoxide, Texas, Houston), use your browser's search features.  For Internet Explorer or Netscape, look top left of screen, click Edit and then Find in Page / Find on This Page; or press the Control Key and F Key at the same time.  Note:  This long file contains all of OSHA's press releases this year about inspections.  It may take longer than normal to download. 

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__________________________________  MAY 2001

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Region 2 News Release: NY 139
May 17, 2001
Contact: Chester J. Fultz
PHONE: 212-337-2319

WORKERS IN NEW YORK AND NEW JERSEY, ILLEGALLY DISCIPLINED FOR FILING
SAFETY COMPLAINTS, AIDED BY OSHA

NEW YORK -- Twenty-two workers in New York and New Jersey who reported workplace
hazards and were discharged or otherwise penalized as a result reached settlements with
their employers in fiscal year 2000 (Sept. 30, 1999 to Oct. 1, 2000), according to a
report issued today by the U. S. Labor Department of Labor.

Under the terms of settlement agreements reached between employers and the Labor
Department's Occupational Safety and Health Administration the 22 workers received a
total of $124,699 in back wages. Other remedies included reinstatement, informal
negotiated settlements between the complainants and their employers, and the
requirement that employers display posters on the rights of employees.

The companies were cited for violating OSHA regulations that prohibit discharging or
otherwise discriminating against any employee because he or she has filed a complaint or
reported unsafe working conditions. The damage amounts represent wages lost from the
date of discharge until the date of settlement.

According to Patricia K. Clark, OSHA regional administrator, OSHA's emphasis was on
timely help for the employee. "The great majority of these cases were resolved quickly --
many in less than a month. The intent of OSHA's whistleblower regulations is that workers
must not be penalized for doing the right thing and speaking out about workplace safety
hazards."

Workers who have been discriminated against for exercising their right to report unsafe
conditions or other protections provided by the Occupational Safety and Health Act must
contact an OSHA office within 30 days of the time they learn of an alleged discriminatory
action taken against them. Truckers, mechanics, and others involved in interstate
trucking have 180 days under provisions of the Surface Transportation Assistance Act.

If the complaint is timely and appears to have merit, OSHA investigates it, ordering
reinstatement or other remedies if an investigation confirms the allegations. Under the
Surface Transportation Assistance Act, either party can file an objection to OSHA's
findings. The matter is then decided by an administrative law judge; a final order is issued
by the Secretary of Labor.

CLICK HERE for a summary of settlements reached in fiscal year 2000.

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Region 6 News Release: USDL-OSHA-01-48-05-15
Tues., May 15, 2001
Contact: Diana Petterson or Elizabeth Todd
Phone: (214) 767-4776, ext. 222 or 221

OSHA CITES AMTOPP CORP. IN LOLITA, TEXAS, FOR 
ALLEGED SAFETY VIOLATIONS; PROPOSES $140,000 IN PENALTIES


DALLAS - The Corpus Christi area office of the Occupational Safety and Health
Administration has cited Amtopp Corp., in Lolita, Texas, with two alleged safety violations
and proposed penalties totaling $140,000, the U.S. Department of Labor announced.

Amtopp Corp. manufactures plastic film and employs about 400 workers.

OSHA discovered the alleged violations during an inspection that began Nov. 30, 2000,
after receiving a formal complaint.

The company was cited with one willful and one repeat violation. The one willful violation
was for failing to provide a standard railing on open-sided floors exposing employees to a
fall hazard. In addition, the investigation found that the access platform to the inspection
station had been altered by the employer and guardrails were not provided on all open
sides. A willful violation is defined as one that is committed with an intentional disregard
of, or plain indifference to, the requirements of the Occupational Safety & Health Act and
regulations.

The repeat violation was for not providing machine guarding to protect operator and
other employees from hazards created by the rotating parts, pinch points and points of
operation. A repeat violation is defined as a violation of any standard, regulation, rule or
order where, upon reinspection, a substantially similar violation is found. 

Employers or workers who have questions concerning safety and health may contact the
OSHA Corpus Christi area office at (361) 888-3420. Or, call OSHA's toll free hotline
number at 1-800-321-6742 to report workplace accidents, fatalities or situations posing
imminent danger to workers. 

Amtopp has 15 working days from receipt of the citations to comply, request an informal
conference with the Corpus Christi OSHA area director, or contest the citations and
proposed penalties before the independent Occupational Safety and Health Review
Commission.

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Region 1 News Release: BOS 2001-059
Tuesday, May 15, 2001
Contact: Ted Fitzgerald
Phone: (617) 565-2074

Over $62,000 in Fines Proposed against Access TCA, Inc.
OSHA CITES WHITINSVILLE, MASS., MANUFACTURER FOR ALLEGED WILLFUL,
REPEAT AND SERIOUS SAFETY VIOLATIONS FOLLOWING WORKER INJURY


BOSTON - The U.S. Labor Department's Occupational Safety and Health Administration
(OSHA) has cited Access TCA, Inc., a Whitinsville, Mass., manufacturer of trade show
exhibits, for alleged willful, repeat and serious violations of the Occupational Safety and
Health Act following an April 11 accident in which an employee suffered severe hand
injuries while operating an unguarded table saw. OSHA has proposed penalties totaling
$62,060 against the employer.

"OSHA's inspection found that the required guard hood that protects operators from the
saw's points of operation was not installed at the time of the accident, thus exposing the
injured worker and any other operator to the dangers of lacerations and amputation," said
Ronald E. Morin, OSHA area director for central and western Massachusetts, who noted
that the inspection also found a second unguarded table saw in another section of the
plant.

In addition, Morin noted, the inspection also identified several other hazards involving
respirators, ventilation, hazardous energy control, hazard communication and electrical
equipment. Access TCA, Inc. had been cited by OSHA in March 2000 for substantially
similar hazards at its Duluth, Georgia, plant.

"Left uncorrected, these various hazards exposed workers at this plant to the dangers of
the unexpected startup of machinery, inadequate ventilation, inadequate respirator
selection and exposure to flammable vapors, combustible residue, thinner, laquer, plastic
and wood dusts, paints, fast drying cement and carbon monoxide," said Morin (A
breakdown of the citations and proposed penalties is attached).

Morin urged central and western Massachusetts employers and employees with questions
regarding workplace safety and health standards to contact the OSHA area office in
Springfield at 413-785-0123 and added that OSHA's toll-free, nationwide hotline --
1-800-321-OSHA (1-800-321-6742) -- may be used to report workplace accidents or
fatalities or situations posing imminent danger to workers, especially if they occur outside
of normal business hours. He also noted that detailed information about OSHA standards
and safe work practices are available via the Internet through OSHA's website:
www.osha.gov.

A willful violation is defined by OSHA as one committed with an intentional disregard of, or
plain indifference to, the requirements of the Occupational Safety and Health Act and
regulations. A repeat citation is issued when OSHA has previously cited an employer for a
substantially similar violation and that citation has become final.

A serious violation is defined as one in which there is a substantial probability that death
or serious physical harm could result, and the employer knew, or should have known, of
the hazard. An other-than-serious violation is a condition which would probably not cause
death or serious physical harm but would have a direct and immediate relationship to the
safety and health of employees.

OSHA is empowered by the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 to issue
standards and rules requiring employers to provide their employees with safe and healthful
workplaces and jobsites, and to assure through workplace inspections that those
standards are followed.

The company has 15 working days from receipt of the citations and proposed penalties to
either elect to comply with them, to request and participate in an informal conference
with the OSHA area director, or to contest them before the independent Occupational
Safety and Health Review Commission.

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Region 6 News Release: USDL-OSHA-01-49-05-15
Tues., May 15, 2001
Contact: Diana Petterson or Elizabeth Todd
Phone: (214) 767-4776, ext. 222 or 221

OSHA CITES MARTIN RESOURCES, INC. IN PLAINVIEW, TEXAS, FOR ALLEGED
SAFETY VIOLATIONS AND PROPOSES $110,488 IN PENALTIES


DALLAS-The Lubbock area office of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration
has cited Martin Resources, Inc., in Plainview, Texas, with 34 alleged safety violations
and proposed penalties totaling $110,488.

Martin Resources, Inc., produces ammonia sulfate and homogeneous fertilizer at the
company's Plainview plant that employs about 38 workers. The parent company, Martin
Resources Management in Kilgore, Texas, employs about 600 workers 

The alleged safety violations were discovered during an OSHA inspection that began Nov.
30, 2000. The company was cited for 32 serious and two other-than-serious violations. 

Some of the 32 serious citations include failing to establish an audible employee alarm
system, failing to label piping to show contents and flow direction, failing to provide
refresher training every three years, lack of verification that employees had received and
understood training, failing to implement the written procedure for mechanical integrity of
process equipment and failing to correct/replace deficient process equipment like pressure
and temperature gauges. 

A serious violation is defined as one in which there is a substantial probability that death
or serious physical harm could result and the employer knew or should have known of the
hazard.

The two other-than-serious violations were for improper respirator storage and
inadequate protection of a spliced flexible cord. An other-than-serious violation is a
hazardous condition that would probably not cause death or serious physical harm, but
would have a direct and immediate relationship to the safety and or health of the
employees. 

Employers or workers who have questions concerning safety and health may contact the
OSHA Lubbock area office at (806) 472-7681. Or, call OSHA's toll free hotline number at
1-800-321-6742 to report workplace accidents, fatalities or situations posing imminent
danger to workers. 

Martin Resources has 15 working days from receipt of the citations to either comply,
request an informal conference with the Lubbock OSHA area director, or contest the
citations and penalties before the independent Occupational Safety and Health Review
Commission.

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Region 2 News Release: NY 138
May 10, 2001
Contact: Chester J. Fultz
Phone: 212-337-2319

ALDEN, NEW YORK, NUTRITIONAL SUPPLEMENT MAKER CITED BY OSHA FOR FAILING
TO ABATE ALLEGED SAFETY AND HEALTH HAZARDS; $146,000 IN PENALTIES
PROPOSED


NEW YORK - The U.S. Labor Department's Occupational Safety and Health Administration
has cited Federal Laboratories Corporation, of 1135 Walden Avenue, Alden, New York, and
proposed penalties of $146,000 against the firm for ten alleged failures to abate
previously cited violations plus five new alleged serious violations of OSHA standards. The
company has until May 29 to contest the citations.

The action results from a follow-up investigation initiated November 8 because OSHA
never received any response to citations issued to the firm in June, 2000, according to
OSHA area director David Boyce. The company produces powdered shark cartilage,
caffeine, and other powdered nutrients and employs 12 workers.

OSHA issued the following failure-to-abate notices:
  • failure to provide standard guardrails on all open sides of a work platform; 
  • failure to establish and maintain a respiratory protection program for employees
    exposed to dust in excess of the permissible exposure limit; 
  • failure to provide medical evaluations to employees required to wear respirators; 
    failure to provide fit-testing or effective training to employees required to wear
    respirators; 
  • failure to establish a lockout/tagout program to prevent the accidental startup of
    machines during servicing or repair; 
  • failure to provide training to employees required to use portable fire extinguishers; 
  • failure to provide training to employees who operate powered industrial trucks; 
  • failure to develop a hazard communication program; 
  • failure to provide information and training on the hazardous chemicals in their work
    areas.

A failure to abate is a notice of additional penalty issued against an employer who has
failed to correct a violation that has become a final order of the Occupational Safety and
Health Review Commission. The total proposed penalty for the alleged failures to abate is
$141,000.

The alleged serious violations for which the employer was cited included:

  • failure to keep fire exits free of obstructions; 
  • failure to select and require the use of appropriate hand protection when
    employees' hands were exposed to thermal burns; 
  • failure to mount, locate, and identify portable fire extinguishers; 
  • failure to properly secure the propane tank to a forklift truck, and ensure that the
    forklift truck had a locating pin to properly position the propane tank on the vehicle.

A serious violation is defined as a condition which exists where there is a substantial
possibility that death or serious physical harm can result. The alleged serious violations
carry a total proposed penalty of $5,000.

The investigation was conducted by OSHA's Buffalo area office, located at 5360 Genesee
Street, Bowmansville, New York, telephone (716) 684-3891.


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Region 4 News Release: USDOL: 01-75
Wed., May 09, 2001
Contact: James Borders
Phone: (904) 232-2895 EXT. 0

OSHA FINES CROWN PRODUCTS $142,000 FOLLOWING 
ACCIDENT AT JACKSONVILLE PLANT


ATLANTA -- The U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health
Administration today cited Crown Products Company, Inc., and proposed fines totaling
$142,000 after a Nov. 20, 2000 accident at one of the company's two Jacksonville, Fla.,
facilities.

OSHA began a comprehensive inspection of the New Kings Rd. plant after a mechanical
power press started up while an employee was trying to unjam it. The machine severed
three of the employee's fingers and crushed his arm, which was later amputated.

The agency fined Crown Products $70,000 for one willful violation for failing to fit the
mechanical power press with a guard to protect workers from amputation hazards. A
willful citation is issued in cases where OSHA finds an intentional disregard of, or plain
indifference to, the Occupational Safety and Health Act and regulations.

James Borders, OSHA's Jacksonville area director explained that a change in production
required replacement of a press machine die to which a physical barrier guard had been
bolted. "This employer knew that the new, smaller die was unguarded, yet instructed
employees to operate the press," said Borders. "Taking the time to follow OSHA
regulations by fitting the replacement part with a guard could have prevented this tragic
accident."

Among nine serious violations cited by OSHA were numerous deficiencies in machine
guarding and lack of lockout procedures to render machinery inoperable during
maintenance and repair, both of which placed employees at risk of amputations. The
company also had no regular power press safety inspection program and no weekly
inspections of the mechanical condition of the presses. The serious citations -- defined
as those in which there is a substantial probability that death or serious physical harm
could result and that the employer knew, or should have known, of the hazard -- drew
proposed penalties of $37,000.

The remaining fines of $35,000 were proposed for three repeat violations. These
addressed the absence of guards to prevent entry of hands or fingers into the point of
operation of the presses and to prevent employee contact with rotating flywheels. The
pulleys and drive belts on the band saw were also unguarded. The company was cited for
similar violations after a May 1998 inspection of the Phillips Highway plant.

Crown Products Company, Inc., a sheet metal fabricator, employs approximately 251
workers, about 33 of whom are assigned to the New Kings Rd. plant. The company has 15
working days to contest OSHA's citations and proposed penalties before the independent
Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission.

Inspection of the worksite was conducted by OSHA's area office located at the Ribault
Building, Room 227, 1851 Executive Center Dr., Jacksonville, Fla. 32207: telephone: (904)
232-2895.

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Region 2 News Release: NY 137
May 8, 2001
Contact: Chester J. Fultz
Phone: 212-337-2319

NIAGARA FALLS, NEW YORK, ELECTRIC POWER FIRM CITED BY OSHA FOR ALLEGED
WILLFUL SAFETY VIOLATIONS; $126,000 IN PENALTIES PROPOSED


NEW YORK -- The U.S. Labor Department's Occupational Safety and Health Administration
has cited C.H. Resources, 5300 Frontier Road, Niagara Falls New York, and proposed
penalties of $126,000 against the firm for two alleged willful violations of OSHA standards.
The company has until May 25 to contest the citations.

The action results from an investigation following an accident on November 16 in which
an employee was seriously injured when he fell about 16 feet from an unguarded platform,
according to OSHA area director David Boyce. The firm, a subsidiary of Central Hudson
Gas and Electric Corporation, operates a coal-fired electrical co-generation facility
employing about 1,200 workers.

OSHA alleges that the company willfully violated OSHA's fall protection standard by failing
to provide fall protection on a platform higher than six feet and failing to provide a ladder
or the equivalent, which is required whenever there is a break in elevation greater than
19 inches. Each willful violation carries a proposed penalty of $63,000.

A willful violation is defined by OSHA as one committed with an intentional disregard for,
or plain indifference to, the requirements of the OSHA act and regulations. 

"OSHA is committed to stringent enforcement in those workplaces where employers
willfully violate OSHA standards," Boyce said. "It is important for employers to know that
in cases such as this, we will take aggressive enforcement action so that others are put
on notice that disregard for employee safety and health is unacceptable and cannot be
tolerated."

The investigation was conducted by OSHA's Buffalo area office, located at 5360 Genesee
Street, Bowmansville, New York, telephone (716) 684-3891.

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Region 5 News Release: V-385
May 3, 2001
Contact: Kimberly A. Stille
Phone: 608-441-5388

Proposed Penalties: $104,000
OSHA ISSUES CITATIONS TO FUTURE FOAM INC. IN MIDDLETON, WIS.


CHICAGO-The U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration
(OSHA) has issued citations alleging six serious violations and two repeat violations to
Future Foam Inc. in Middleton, Wis., with proposed penalties of $104,000.

A safety and health inspection was initiated at the worksite on November 15, 2000, after
workers were reportedly exposed to methylene chloride and TDI
(toluene-2,4-diisocyanate) in excess of OSHA's permissible exposure limits.

The alleged repeat violations identified one employee overexposure to methylene chloride.
The company was cited for employee overexposure to methylene chloride following an
OSHA inspection in July 1999.

The alleged serious violations addressed employee overexposures to TDI, fall hazards,
lack of specific worksite procedures for respiratory protection, insufficient engineering
controls and lack of periodic monitoring of methylene chloride.

The worksite has had seven previous OSHA inspections with a total of 17 serious
violations. Additionally, Future Foam Inc., has been inspected 27 times since 1974 at
worksites in Mississippi, Kansas, Utah, Iowa, Texas, Colorado, Oklahoma and Missouri.

OSHA defines a serious violation as a hazardous condition in which there is a substantial
probability that death or serious physical harm could result and the employer knew or
should have known of the hazard. The maximum penalty for a serious violation is $7,000.

OSHA defines a repeat violation as one in which the employer has been cited for a
substantially similar condition and the citation has become a final order. The maximum
penalty for a repeat violation is $70,000.

Future Foam Inc. has 72 employees in Middleton where they manufacture polyurethane
foam. There are 600 employees company-wide.

Future Foam, Inc. has 15 working days to contest the citations and proposed penalties
before the independent Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission.

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Region 4 News Release: USDOL: 01-70
Wed., May 2, 2001
Contact: Teresa Harrison
Phone: (912) 652-4393

OSHA FINES DURANGO-GEORGIA PAPER COMPANY $157,500 FOLLOWING
AMPUTATION AT ST. MARYS, GA., MILL
Company was cited in August 2000 after similar accident


ATLANTA -- The U.S. Labor Department's Occupational Safety and Health Administration
cited Durango-Georgia Paper Co.Thurs., April 26, for the second time in eight months, and
proposed penalties totaling $157,500, following a double amputation at the company's St.
Marys facility.

The agency received a complaint after an employee's arms were caught and amputated in
an unguarded paper machine on Nov.1. The worker remained trapped for more than 30
minutes before maintenance workers were able to free him. Last August, OSHA cited
Durango after an employee's hand was crushed in a similar accident.

OSHA is proposing two willful violations with penalties of $140,000 for machine guarding
and "lock-out/tag-out" hazards, according to Teresa Harrison, OSHA's Savannah area
director. A willful violation is one committed with an intentional disregard of, or plain
indifference to, the requirements of the Occupational Safety and Health Act and
regulations.

"If the employer had heeded our concerns eight months ago regarding machine guarding
and lockout/tagout, this tragic accident could have been avoided," said Harrison. "The
company failed to lock out the machine to render it inoperable during maintenance."

Additional penalties of $17,500 are being proposed for three serious safety violations:
elevated platforms did not have guardrails to keep employees from falling; proper tools
were not provided to employees to clean paper machine rollers; and employees were not
trained in lockout/tagout procedures to make machinery inoperable during maintenance
and repair. 

OSHA defines a serious violation as one in which there is substantial probability that
death or serious physical harm could result and that the employer knew or should have
known of the hazard.

The company, a subsidiary of Mexico-based Corporation Durango, has 15 working days to
contest the citations and proposed penalties before the independent Occupational Safety
and Health Review Commission. The earlier citations were contested and are now before
the Review Commission.

Corporation Durango has approximately 3000 employees, with about 1200 at the St.
Marys site.

The inspection was conducted by OSHA's Savannah area office located at 450 Mall
Boulevard, Suite J, Savannah, Ga., 31406; telephone: (912) 652-4393.

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Region 4 News Release: USDOL: 01-71
Wed., May 2, 2001
Contact: Teresa Harrison
Phone: (912) 652-4393

OSHA AGAIN CITES DUBLIN, GA., CONSTRUCTION COMPANY; PROPOSES $68,600 IN
PENALTIES


ATLANTA -- The Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration
cited Dublin Construction Co. Thurs., April 26, for failure to protect workers from fall
hazards, just three months after the company was cited for similar violations.

During a March 28 inspection, OSHA observed workers without safety harnesses installing
plastic sheeting near an unguarded roof edge more than 29 feet from the ground. The
agency cited Dublin Construction for a willful violation -- one committed with an
intentional disregard of, or plain indifference to, requirements of the Occupational Safety
and Health Act -- and proposed a $63,000 penalty.

"Safety equipment was stored at the job site," said Teresa Harrison, OSHA's Savannah
area director, "but management officials wanted the sheeting installed quickly -- before
rain could damage expensive drywall. And guardrails, another form of protection, had
been removed from the roof edges so stucco could be applied to the side of the building."

A willful citation was issued, according to Harrison, because "officals knowingly exposed
employees to fall hazards, the same hazards we cited them for in January."

OSHA also issued a serious citation with a $5,600 proposed penalty for failing to conduct
regular safety inspections of the job site and equipment. A serious violation is one in
which there is a substantial probability that death or serious physical harm could result
and that the employer knew, or should have known, of the hazard.

According to OSHA, falls are a leading cause of fatalities in the construction industry and
the numbers have been on the rise in Georgia. "In our last fiscal year, from Oct. 1999
through Sept. 2000, we recorded eight fatal falls in the state's construction industry,"
said Harrison. "That number jumped to ten in just the first six months of this fiscal year."

Dublin Construction Co. has 15 working days to contest the citations and proposed
penalties before the independent Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission.

The inspection was conducted by OSHA's Savannah area office located at 450 Mall
Boulevard, Suite J, Savannah, Ga., 31406; telephone: (912) 652-4393.

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Region 1 News Release: BOS 2001-051
Wednesday, May 2, 2001
Contact: Ted Fitzgerald
Phone: (617) 565-2074


Need for trench safety stressed to Connecticut employers
OSHA CITES BRIDGEPORT, CONN., CONTRACTOR FOR ALLEGED WILLFUL AND
SERIOUS SAFETY VIOLATIONS AT SHELTON TRENCHING SITE


BOSTON -- The U.S. Labor Department's Occupational Safety and Health Administration
(OSHA) has cited Complete Construction Company, Inc., of Bridgeport, Connecticut, for
alleged Willful and Serious violations of the Occupational Safety and Health Act at a
Shelton, Conn., water main installation site and has proposed $38,500 in penalties against
the contractor.

The violations were discovered during an OSHA inspection initiated April 6, 2001, at
trenches located on Cathy Drive near Great Oak Road in Shelton, said Clifford S. Weston,
OSHA area director in Bridgeport.

"OSHA found that workers were exposed to cave-in and fall hazards while working in or
accessing inadequately protected trenches up to 16 feet deep," he said. "In addition, the
competent person onsite, the one with knowledge and authority to spot and correct
hazards, neither addressed these hazards nor removed workers from exposure to them." 

"Of particular concern is that, after documenting employees working in an unsafe trench
on April 6, the OSHA inspector observed employees in another unsafe trench upon
returning to the jobsite four days later," said Weston. 

Noting the increase in construction and excavation work prompted by warmer weather,
Weston reminded Connecticut employers to ensure that excavations 5 or more feet in
depth be properly protected against collapse: 

"Let's not kid ourselves, unprotected trenches can be lethal; their sidewalls can collapse
suddenly and with great force, burying workers beneath tons of soil and debris before
they have a chance to react or escape," he said. "Forty-four American workers died and
scores of others were injured in trench cave-ins in 1999, according to the Bureau of
Labor Statistics. The best way to reduce the number of fatalities is to ensure that proper
and effective collapse protection is in place and in use before employees enter an
excavation."

Weston emphasized that excavation safety is a national emphasis program for OSHA. If
OSHA compliance officers encounter an excavation in the course of their duties, they will
stop and examine it. If hazardous conditions are spotted, an inspection can be opened on
the spot with violations resulting in citations and fines.

He urged Connecticut employers and employees with questions regarding excavations or
other workplace safety and health standards to contact the OSHA area offices in
Bridgeport (203-579-5581) or Hartford (860-240-3152) and added that detailed
information on excavation safety (including standards, publications, links and a
compliance assistance tool) is available on OSHA's website www.osha.gov .

Specifically, Complete Construction Company, Inc. was cited for:

One alleged willful violation, with a proposed penalty of $35,000, for:
-- on two separate days, employees were working in trenches 5 to 6 feet deep and
16 feet deep, respectively, that were unprotected or inadequately protected
against cave-ins;

Two alleged Serious violations, with $3,500 in penalties proposed, for 
-- employees exposed to falls of up to 16 feet while accessing a trench;
-- where hazardous conditions were visibly obvious, the competent person onsite
did not take precautions and corrective actions or remove workers from exposure to
the hazards.

A willful violation is defined by OSHA as one committed with an intentional disregard of, or
plain indifference to, the requirements of the Occupational Safety and Health Act and
regulations. A serious violation is defined as one in which there is a substantial probability
that death or serious physical harm could result, and the employer knew, or should have
known, of the hazard.

OSHA is empowered by the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 to issue
standards and rules requiring employers to provide their employees with safe and healthful
workplaces and jobsites, and to assure through workplace inspections that those
standards are followed. 

The company has 15 working days from receipt of the citations and proposed penalties to
either elect to comply with them, to request and participate in an informal conference
with the OSHA area director, or to contest them before the independent Occupational
Safety and Health Review Commission.

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__________________________________  APRIL 2001

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Region 6 News Release: USDL-OSHA-01-40-04-26
Thurs., Apr. 26, 2001
Contact: Diana Petterson
Phone: (214) 767-4776, ext. 222

OSHA CITES JESSE CRAIG PAINTING CO. INC. IN LOS LUNAS, NEW MEXICO, FOR
ALLEGED SAFETY VIOLATIONS; PROPOSES $34,000 IN PENALTIES


DALLAS -- The Occupational Safety and Health Administration has cited Jesse Craig
Painting Co. Inc. in Los Lunas, New Mexico, with five alleged safety violations and
proposed penalties totaling $34,000, the U.S. Department of Labor announced today.

Jesse Craig Painting Co. is a telecommunications tower painting and maintenance
company.

OSHA discovered the alleged safety violations during an inspection that began Oct. 30,
2000, after an employee was killed and another received serious injuries when they fell
while being hoisted up a 500 foot telecommunications tower. The accident occurred
about 18 miles east of Pecos, Texas.

The company was cited for two willful, two serious and one other-than-serious safety
violations. The two willful violations involved failing to use proper safety equipment to
hoist workers and failing to use ladder safety devices, cages or other adequate fall
protection equipment. Willful violations are defined as those committed with an intentional
disregard of, or plain indifference to, the requirements of the Occupational Safety &
Health Act and regulations.

The two serious violations were for failing to inspect personal protective devices, tools
and equipment and failing to inspect safety belts and straps. A serious violation involves
conditions in which there is a substantial probability that death or serious physical harm
could result and the employer knew or should have known of the hazardous conditions.

The other-than-serious violation involved the lack of a written certification record of
training for first aid and respiration training of employees. Other-than-serious violations
involve hazardous conditions that would probably not cause death or serious physical
harm but would have a direct and immediate relationship to the safety and health of
employees.

Jesse Craig Painting has 15 working days from receipt of the citations to comply, request
an informal hearing with OSHA's Lubbock area director, or to contest the citations and
penalties before the independent Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission.

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Region 4 News Release: USDOL: 01-64
Wed., April 18, 2001
Contact: Susan Johnston
Phone: (404) 984-8700 ext. 0

OSHA CITES ATLANTA CONSTRUCTION COMPANY AFTER FATAL FALL


ATLANTA -- The U.S. Labor Department's Occupational Safety and Health Administration
cited Atlanta-based Turner Construction Co. April 5 for serious safety violations and
proposed penalties totaling $42,000 in connection with the death of a United Rentals
employee at a demolition site.

As part of the demolition and remodeling of a downtown retail building, a construction
crew removed an escalator, creating a floor opening. This unguarded opening was
obscured by a tarp installed to control dust. On Jan. 4, a United Rentals employee,
on-site to repair equipment, fell 17 feet through the opening.

"Construction companies know that floor openings are a common hazard and falls are a
leading cause of death in the industry," said Susan Johnston, OSHA's Atlanta-West area
director. "This company should have had increased awareness because they were cited
previously for this hazard at a New York construction site." 

OSHA cited the company for one repeat violation with a proposed penalty of $35,000 for
the unguarded floor hole. A serious citation drew additional penalties of $7,000 for failure
to close off an undesignated access way to the hazardous location.

OSHA defines a repeat violation as one where an employer has been cited previously for a
substantially similar condition and the citation has become a final order of the
Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission.

A serious violation is defined as one in which there is substantial probability that death or
serious physical harm could result and that the employer knew or should have known of
the hazard.

Turner Construction Co. employs approximately 4200 workers and had five at this site.
The company has 15 working days from receipt of OSHA's citations to contest them and
the proposed penalties before the independent Occupational Safety and Health Review
Commission. 

Inspection of the worksite was conducted by OSHA's Atlanta-West area office located at
2400 Herodian Way, Suite 250, Smyrna, Ga., 30080-2968; telephone: (770) 984-8700.

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Region 2 News Release: NY 129
April 17, 2001
Contact: Chester J. Fultz
Phone: 212-337-2319

VALLEY COTTAGE, NEW YORK TOFU MANUFACTURER CITED BY OSHA
$142,500 IN PENALTIES PROPOSED

NEW YORK -- The U. S. Labor Department's Occupational Safety and Health
Administration has cited Global Protein Foods, Inc., of 707 Executive Blvd, Valley Cottage,
NY, and proposed penalties of $142,500 against the firm, alleging three willful, seven
serious, and one alleged other-than-serious violation of OSHA standards.

The citations result from an inspection of the company's facilities conducted from Oct.
19, 2000, through Jan. 3, 2001, following a complaint of unsafe working conditions,
according to Philip Piest, OSHA area director in Tarrytown.

OSHA cited the company for three alleged willful violations:
  • failure to ensure that employees used appropriate eye protection and failure to
    provide an eye wash for employees.
  • failure to properly guard machinery.
  • failure to kept exit areas free from obstructions. 

The alleged willful violations carry a total proposed penalty of $132,000.

The company also received seven OSHA citations for alleged serious violations:

  • failure to maintain floors in as dry a condition as possible.
  • failure to keep aisles in good repair.
  • failure to properly store oxygen and acetylene cylinders.
  • failure to provide unobstructed access to circuit breaker panels.
  • failure to provide covers for electrical boxes.
  • failure to keep an outside exit area free from ice.
  • failure to develop, implement and maintain a hazard communication program.

The alleged serious violations carry a total proposed penalty of $10,500.

In addition, the company received a citation for not providing hand soap in the lavatories,
an alleged other-than-serious violation.

A willful violation is defined by OSHA as one committed with an intentional disregard for,
or plain indifference to, the requirements of the OSH act and regulations. A repeat
violation is defined as a condition which exists where there is a substantial probability
that death or serious physical harm can result. An other-than-serious violation is a
hazardous condition that would probably not cause death or serious physical harm, but
would have a direct and immediate relationship to the safety and health of employees.

The inspection was conducted by OSHA's Tarrytown area office, located at 660 White
Plains Road, Tarrytown, N.Y. Telephone: (914) 524-7510.

The company has until May 7 to contest the citations.


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Region 2 News Release: NY 130
April 17, 2001
Contact: Chester J. Fultz
Phone: 212-337-2319

KEARNY, NEW JERSEY FILM COMPANY CITED BY OSHA FOR ALLEGED
SAFETY AND HEALTH VIOLATIONS FOLLOWING
SERIOUS EMPLOYEE INJURY; $197,250 IN PENALTIES PROPOSED


NEW YORK -- The U. S. Labor Department's Occupational Safety and Health
Administration cited The Amerifilm Corporation of 85 Lincoln Highway, Kearny, N.J., on
April 10, and proposed penalties of $197,250 against the firm, alleging five willful, 14
serious, and six other-than-serious violations of OSHA standards.

The citations result from an inspection conducted from Oct.17, 2000, to April 10, 2001,
following notification from the Kearny Police Department that an accident had occurred at
the facility. On October 11, an employee sustained a serious injury when his hand was
caught and crushed in the gears of an unguarded printing press, according to David
Ippolito, OSHA area director in Parsippany.

OSHA cited the company for the following alleged willful violations: 
  • failure to properly guard the nip points of machinery.
  • failure to provide appropriate foot protection for employees.
  • failure to provide authorized personnel with individual de-energizing machinery
    locks.
  • failure to follow proper lockout/tagout procedures when performing machine
    maintenance.
  • failure to provide fire extinguisher training to employees.

The alleged willful violations carry a total proposed penalty of $174,000.

"This employer made no attempt to install machine guarding on his equipment, even after
the serious injury to one of his employees," Ippolito said. "The willful disregard shown by
this employer with respect to employee safety meant that another machine operator,
who was not even briefed about the previous accident, could be exposed to the same
hazard."

Among the alleged serious violations for which OSHA cited the company are:

  • failure to establish specific lockout/tagout procedures.
  • failure to properly guard the points of operation of machinery, including grinders,
    belts and pulleys and failure to eliminate electrical hazards.
  • failure to keep exits unobstructed.
  • failure to provide a hearing conservation program for employees.
  • failure to properly store flammable liquids.
  • failure to enforce the wearing and use of personal protective equipment.
  • failure to establish a blood borne pathogen training program. 

The alleged serious violations carry a total proposed penalty of $21,250.

In addition, OSHA cited the firm for alleged other-than-serious violations, including:

  • failure to provide respiratory training for employees.
  • failure to properly monitor employee exposure to formaldehyde.
  • failure to maintain material safety data sheets for each chemical used in the
    plant. 

The alleged other-than-serious violations carry a total proposed penalty of $2,000.

A willful violation is defined by OSHA as one committed with an intentional disregard for,
or plain indifference to, the requirements of the OSH Act and regulations. A serious
violation is defined as a condition which exists where there is a substantial possibility that
death or serious physical harm can result. An other-than-serious violation is a hazardous
condition that would probably not cause death or serious physical harm, but would have a
direct and immediate relationship to the safety and health of employees.

The investigation was conducted by OSHA's Parsippany area office, located at 299 Cherry
Hill Road, Suite 304, Parsippany, N. J. Telephone: (973) 263-1003.

The company has until May 1 to contest the citations.


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Region 10 News Release: 01-57
April 11, 2001
Contact: Jeannine Lupton
PHONE: (206) 553-7620
TDD: 1-800-676-8956

OSHA ISSUES CITATIONS TO LAIDLAW TRANSIT SERVICES FOR SAFETY VIOLATIONS
IN BOISE, IDAHO


SEATTLE - The U.S. Labor Department's Occupational Safety and Health Administration
announced today it has issued a willful citation, serious citation and other-than-serious
citation to the Laidlaw Transit Services district office in Commerce City, Colo. The
citations carry a total of $123,000 in proposed penalties for alleged job safety violations
at Boise Urban Stages in Boise, Idaho.

The citations were issued following an investigation by OSHA's Boise Area Office in
response to an employee complaint, according to Ryan Kuehmichel, area director for the
Boise office.

Laidlaw Transit Services' willful citation stated that equipment, wiring methods and
installations of equipment in hazardous locations were not safe or approved for those
locations.

The serious citation noted the following violations: the company did not provide a
workplace free from the recognized hazards and employees were exposed to the hazard
of fire and explosion from an inadequately maintained Compressed Natural Gas
Compression System; employees were exposed to being struck or crushed by an
inadequately designed and installed crane; trapdoor floor openings were not guarded by
floor opening covers; compressed gas cylinders were not inspected regularly; fall
protective equipment was not provided; the employer did not provide a written
respiratory protection program or an energy control procedure or training; machine
guarding was not provided; and lack of material safety data sheets for each hazardous
chemical used and lack of information and training on hazardous chemicals used in the
workplace.

The other-than-serious citation stated that the floor-rated load capacity was not
determined or posted at the overhead storage mezzanine area; lack of a written
emergency action plan and lack of training on the use of portable fire extinguishers for
employees.

According to Kuehmichel, the company has 15 working days to contest the citations.


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Region 4 News Release: USDOL: 01-63
Mon., April 9, 2001
Contact: Lawrence J. Falck
Phone: (813) 626-1177

OSHA FINES TWO FLORIDA CONTRACTORS MORE THAN $110,000 FOLLOWING
FATAL PORT RICHEY ACCIDENT


The U.S. Labor Department's Occupational Safety and Health Administration has cited
Brooksville Crane Service, Inc., and Chuck Evans, Inc., for willful and serious safety
violations and proposed penalties totaling $110,250 after investigating a fatal accident at
a residential construction site in Port Richey, Fla.

A worker, employed by framing contractor Chuck Evans, Inc., was killed on Oct. 9, 2000
when a beam being lifted by a crane shifted and struck him in the head.

Following an investigation of the accident, OSHA cited both Chuck Evans, Inc., and
Brooksville Crane Service, Inc., the owner/operator of the crane used to lift and place
structural parts during construction of the private residence.

Brooksville Crane Service received one willful citation with a $70,000 penalty for making
structural changes to the crane without checking manufacturer's specifications or
limitations or consulting a qualified engineer.

"This company created the hazard responsible for the accident through its indifference to
worker safety," said Lawrence Falck, OSHA's Tampa area director. "Despite full knowledge
of requirements to follow manufacturer's specifications, this employer increased the radius
and weight capacity of the crane beyond the maximum recommended for safe handling."

Falck continued, "As a result of overloading the crane, its hydraulic system failed which
allowed the load to shift and strike an employee. Had the company followed the
manufacturer's specifications or contacted a qualified engineer to determine potential
consequences, this accident could have been avoided."

Nine serious citations against Brooksville Crane resulted in additional penalties of $35,350.
The serious violations included:
  • the crane's synthetic nylon slings showed numerous signs of serious wear and were not
    properly marked to identify manufacturer, rated capacity or type of material;
  • crane parts were in disrepair;
  • neither a load chart nor hand signal chart was posted in the crane's cab or available on the
    jobsite, and
  • alterations made by the employer to the crane did not have written manufacturer's approval
    prior to use

Falck said, "Just as Brooksville Crane's action created a hazardous situation, Chuck
Evans, Inc.'s failure to act placed employees in harm's way."

The company was cited for two serious violations with a penalty of $4,900 for failing to
provide protective helmets to workers in areas with overhead hazards and not removing
the crane's synthetic web slings from service when they showed signs of such excessive
cuts and abrasions that the red safety warning strand was visible.

OSHA defines a willful violation as one committed with an intentional disregard of, or plain
indifference to, the requirements of the OSH Act and regulations.

A serious violation is one in which there is a substantial probability that death or serious
physical harm could result and that the employer knew or should have known of the
hazard.

Each of the cited companies has 15 working days to contest OSHA citations and
proposed penalties before the independent Occupational Safety and Health Review Board.
Brooksville Crane Service, located in Brooksville, Fla., employs four workers, one of whom
was at the Port Richey worksite; Hudson, Fla.-based Chuck Evans, Inc., had all six of its
workers on-site at the time of the accident.

Inspection of the worksite was conducted by OSHA's Tampa area office located at 5807
Breckenridge Parkway, Suite A, Tampa, Fla. 33610; telephone: (813) 626-1177.


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Region 4 News Release: USDOL: 01-61
Fri., April 6, 2001
Contact: Paul Alvarado
Phone: (205) 731-1534

OSHA FINES BIRMINGHAM MANUFACTURED HOME BUILDER $79,600 FOLLOWING
FATAL ACCIDENT


The U.S. Labor Department's Occupational Safety and Health Administration today cited
Spiral Industry, Inc., a Birmingham manufactured home builder, and fined the company
$79,600 following investigation of a fatal accident.

An employee was critically injured on Oct. 12 when he was caught between two sections
of a double-wide mobile home as they were being pushed together. The victim died a
month later after surgery in connection with his injuries.

Following an investigation of the accident, OSHA cited Spiral Industry for 12 serious and
five repeat safety violations. 

OSHA defines a serious violation as one in which there is substantial probability that
death or serious physical harm could result and that the employer knew or should have
known of the hazard. The 12 serious citations, with penalties totaling $47,600, included: 
  • failure to protect employees from potential crushing hazards when mobile home
    sections are moved; 
  • failure to protect workers from fall hazards by properly guarding suspended
    platforms and ensuring they remain free of debris; 
  • neglecting to install toe boards on suspended platforms to protect employees from
    overhead hazards; 
  • exposing employees to fire and explosion hazards by failing to protect a gasoline
    tank from vehicular damage during refueling operations; 
  • failure to provide workers with proper personal protective equipment; 
  • failure to properly label hazardous chemicals; 
  • lack of a workplace hazard assessment, and 
  • unguarded belts and pulleys. 

The remaining penalty of $32,000 was proposed for violations which were categorized as
repeat because the company had been cited for the same or similar hazards previously.
These included failure to install adequate guarding at suspended platforms; allowing
suspended platforms to be cluttered with debris; failure to properly identify exits;
unguarded saw blades, and failure to identify circuits and disconnects which could cause
electrical shocks.

"This employer did not take necessary precautions to safeguard workers from crushing
hazards while joining two halves of a double-wide home," said Paul Alvarado, OSHA's
acting area director in Birmingham. "Several safety lapses contributed to the fatal
accident, including failing to ensure that the mobile home sections were unoccupied
before they were pushed together; not notifying nearby employees of the planned
movement, and reassigning ‘spotters' to help push the motor home sections rather than
ensuring that they remained at their stations to look out for the safety of other
employees."

Alvarado added, "Other protective measures were also lacking. Workers on a suspended
platform without guardrails were placed at substantial risk of injury from falls and others
working with unguarded saws were exposed to potential cuts and amputations." 

Spiral Industry, which employs approximately 120 workers, has 15 working days to
contest OSHA's citations and proposed penalties before the independent Occupational
Safety and Health Review Commission.

Inspection of the Birmingham company was conducted by OSHA's area office located at
Vestavia Village, 2047 Canyon Road, Birmingham, Ala. 35216; telephone: (205) 731-1534.


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Region 4 News Release: USDOL: 01-59
Tues., April 3, 2001
Contact: Clyde Payne
Phone: (601) 965-4606

OSHA CITES CELL PHONE TOWER CONSTRUCTION COMPANY FOLLOWING FATAL
FALL


OSHA has cited Louisville, Ky.-based MCS Telecom, Inc., for six serious safety violations
and proposed $25,300 in penalties following the investigation of a fatal accident at a
Moss Point, Miss., cellular telephone tower construction site.

Almost one-third of the planned 340-foot structure had been completed Jan. 12, when
the MCS employee attached the hook of his body belt to the tower, preparing to add
another 20-foot section. As he worked, the hook — which had a defective closure
without a locking device — detached from the tower and he fell 100 feet.

"This employer failed to provide workers with proper safety equipment, and did not
inspect safety equipment that was supplied by the workers. In addition to being
defective, the hook involved in this accident was not designed to be used with personal
protective equipment," Clyde Payne, OSHA's Jackson, Miss., area director, said.

"Fatalities are increasing in this fast-paced industry," Payne added. "We often see
contracts stipulating that towers be completed within a certain number of work hours.
Speed must not override safety."

OSHA cited the company for not providing employees with proper fall protection and fall
arrest systems. Serious citations were also issued for failure to inspect equipment for
damage and wear; provide fall protection training to employees, and have a person
trained in first-aid and first-aid supplies at the site.

A serious violation is one in which there is substantial probability that death or serious
physical harm could result and the employer knew, or should have known, of the hazard.

MCS Telecom, Inc., employs about 40 workers, five of whom were working at the Moss
Point site. The company has 15 working days from receipt of OSHA's citations to contest
them and the proposed penalties before the independent Occupational Safety and Health
Review Commission.

The inspection of the Moss Point job site was conducted by OSHA's area office located at
3780 I-55 North, Suite 210, Jackson, Mississippi. 39211; telephone: (601) 965-4606.

OSHA urges employers and employees with questions regarding workplace safety and
health standards to contact the Jackson area office. OSHA's toll-free, nationwide hotline-
1-800-321-OSHA (1-800-321-6742)- may be used to report workplace accidents or
fatalities or situations posing imminent danger to workers, especially if they occur outside
of normal business hours.

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Region 1 News Release: BOS 2001-034
Monday, April 2, 2001
Contact: Ted Fitzgerald
Phone: (617) 565-2074

OSHA PROPOSES $69,000 IN FINES AGAINST BIG DIG CONTRACTOR FOR ALLEGED
SERIOUS HEALTH & SAFETY VIOLATIONS AT SOUTH STATION UNDERGROUND
CONSTRUCTION PROJECT

The U.S. Labor Department's Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has
cited Slattery/Interbeton/J.F. White/Perini, J.V., a contractor on Boston's Central
Artery/Tunnel Project, for alleged Serious and Other than Serious violations of the
Occupational Safety and Health Act at an underground construction site. $69,000 in
penalties are proposed against the contractor.

The alleged violations were discovered by OSHA during safety and health inspections of a
tunnel jacking project located beneath railroad tracks leading into Boston's South Station
railway terminal. OSHA initiated its inspections on December 5, 2001, as part of its
ongoing monitoring of workplace safety and health on the Big Dig, said Brenda Gordon,
OSHA area director for Boston and Southeastern Massachusetts.

"The health inspection found instances in which employees were overexposed to airborne
concentrations of crystalline silica generated during construction and the employer failed
to take necessary steps to minimize this hazard, even though its own sampling for silica
showed excess silica levels," said Gordon. "The safety inspection identified several fall
hazards, employees working without fall protection, electrical hazards, an impalement
hazard, and inadequate protection against flying debris for equipment operators working
at the tunnel's face."

Gordon explained that crystalline silica, a basic component of sand and gravel, is often
generated during tunneling and other construction activities. Continued exposure to
crystalline silica can lead to silicosis, a lung disease which causes scar tissue formation in
the lungs that reduces their ability to extract oxygen from the air. Crystalline silica is also
a known human carcinogen. OSHA standards require employers to develop and implement
engineering controls to reduce exposure levels to toxic substances and, where respirators
are used, to implement an effective and continuous respirator program.

"Though many of the cited hazards were addressed during the course of the inspection, it
should not have taken an OSHA inspection to prompt this employer to ensure that these
basic, well-known and necessary worker safeguards were in place and in use at this
jobsite."

Specifically:

The Health inspection resulted in $35,000 in proposed penalties for five alleged Serious
violations, for:
  • four employees were exposed to excess levels of silica-containing crystalline quartz
    and the employer had failed to implement feasible engineering controls to reduce
    those exposure levels; 
  • failure to designate a qualified administrator for the worksite's respiratory protection
    program in that silica sampling conducted by the employer between May 1999 and
    December 2000 had not been correctly evaluated, respiratory protection had not
    been mandated, and employees' overexposure to silica went undetected; 
  • failure to identify and evaluate silica as a respiratory hazard in the workplace; 
  • failure to effectively evaluate the worksite's respiratory protection program to
    ensure its correct implementation and continued effectiveness and failure to
    regularly consult affected employees in order to identify and correct problems; 
  • failure to instruct employees in the recognition and avoidance of unsafe conditions
    concerning silica and in applicable regulations and protective measures.

 
The Safety inspection resulted in $34,000 in proposed penalties for sixteen alleged
Serious violations, for:

  • employees were not adequately protected against falls of up to 30 feet while
    climbing and working on concrete forms due to lack of a fall protection system at
    that location; 
  • employees were exposed to falls of up to 14 feet from bays where guardrails were
    not installed at unprotected edges; 
  • employees were exposed to a fall of 6-feet, 4-inches due to missing rails on a pipe
    scaffold stair tower; 
  • employees were exposed to falls through unguarded or uncovered holes and an
    uncovered ladder opening; 
  • toeboards were not installed along the edge of a mezzanine deck from which
    materials and equipment could fall onto employees working and walking below; 
    employees operating roadheaders at the face of the tunnel wall were not
    adequately protected against flying debris, such as wood splints and rock chips,
    due to an inadequate screen in the front of the operator's cab; 
  • debris, materials and equipment were stored in front of electrical boxes, obstructing
    clear access; 
  • a power cord was not equipped with a ground fault circuit interrupter; worn and cut
    extension cords were used to power equipment; 
  • missing corner lights on a vehicle were not replaced before it was put in use; 
    the backup alarm on a front end loader was not distinguishable from surrounding
    noise level; 
  • a grinder lacked a tongue guard and shield, was not secured to the floor and had
    excess space between its surface wheel and its work rest; 
  • workers were exposed to impalement injuries from an unprotected, protruding rebar.

Gordon urged Eastern Massachusetts employers and employees with questions regarding
workplace safety and health standards to contact the OSHA area offices in Braintree or
Methuen and added that OSHA's toll-free, nationwide hotline -- 1-800-321-OSHA
(1-800-321-6742) -- may be used to report workplace accidents or fatalities or situations
posing imminent danger to workers, especially if they occur outside of normal business
hours.

A serious violation is defined by OSHA as one in which there is a substantial probability
that death or serious physical harm could result, and the employer knew, or should have
known, of the hazard.

OSHA is empowered by the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 to issue
standards and rules requiring employers to provide their employees with safe and healthful
workplaces and jobsites, and to assure through workplace inspections that those
standards are followed.

The company has 15 working days from receipt of the citations and proposed penalties to
either elect to comply with them, to request and participate in an informal conference
with the OSHA area director, or to contest them before the independent Occupational
Safety and Health Review Commission.


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__________________________________  MARCH 2001

.

Region 2 News Release: NY 124
March 27, 2001
Contact: Chester J. Fultz
Phone: 212-337-2319

WILLIAMSTOWN, NEW YORK, WIRE-MAKING PLANT CITED BY OSHA FOR ALLEGED
SAFETY AND HEALTH VIOLATIONS; $78,000 IN PENALTIES PROPOSED


The U.S. Labor Department's Occupational Safety and Health Administration has cited
Omega Wire, Inc., Route 13, Williamstown, New York, and proposed penalties of $78,000
against the firm for four alleged repeat violations, 16 alleged serious violations, and three
alleged other-than-serious violations of OSHA standards. The company has until April 13
to contest the citations.

According to OSHA area director Diane Brayden, the action results from an investigation
conducted from October 30 through February 23 following an accident at the plant, in
which an employee was seriously injured when her hair became entangled in a wire
buncher.

The alleged serious violations for which the employer was cited included:
  • failure to guard a rotating die holder on a wire buncher; 
  • failure to assess the need for personal protective equipment such as gloves and
    eye protection; 
  • failure to provide proper gloves and eye protection when employees were working
    with caustic chemicals; 
  • failure to provide a written respirator program, medical exams, and fit tests for
    employees who were required to wear respirators as part of their job; 
  • failure to provide handrails on stairs; 
  • failure to label clearly the controller for a 3 ton hoist; 
  • failure to provide guards on saws, projecting shaft ends of drive motors, projecting
    keys on rotating shafts, and other machines; 
  • failure to adequately guard electrical parts.

The serious violations carry a total proposed penalty of $35,500.

OSHA also cited the employer for failure to provide strain relief on electrical cords, to
guard openings on electrical circuit breaker panels, to provide emergency eyewash
facilities, and failure to determine the capacity of lifting devices, four alleged repeat
violations carrying a total proposed penalty of $37,700.

A repeat violation is one for which an employer has been previously cited for the same or
a substantially similar condition and the citation has become a final order of the
Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission. Omega Wire was previously cited for
these conditions at a plant in Jordan, New York in October, 1999.

The firm was also cited for failing to adequately maintain the required log of injuries and
illnesses, failure to label circuit breakers for what they controlled, and failure to repair
damaged insulation on an electrical cord, three alleged other-than-serious violations.

A serious violation is defined as a condition which exists where there is a substantial
possibility that death or serious physical harm can result. An other-than-serious violation
is a hazardous condition that would probably not cause death or serious physical harm
but would have a direct and immediate relationship to the safety and health of
employees. 

The investigation was conducted by OSHA's Syracuse area office, located at 3300
Vickery Road, North Syracuse, New York, telephone (315) 451-0808.


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Region 3 News Release: USDL: III-01-03-26-022-PGH
Mon., Mar. 26, 2001
Contact: Leni Uddyback-Fortson
Office: (215) 861-5102

FREEPORT, PA FIRM CITED FOR SAFETY AND HEALTH VIOLATIONS


The U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration has cited
Freeport Brick, Freeport, Pa., for alleged violations of safety and health standards and
proposed $180,300 in penalties. The company manufactures clay and high aluminum brick.

According to Robert Szymanski, area director of the Pittsburgh OSHA office, the company
was issued two willful violations for safety, one willful citation for health (grouped
violations), seven repeat violations, 12 serious violations, and eight other-than-serious
violations.

"The willful safety violations, with a proposed penalty of $84,000, concern the
overloading of fork trucks and other fork lift deficiencies which put the employees at
considerable risk of injury," said Szymanski. "The willful health violations, with a penalty of
$33,000, were for overexposure to silica, lack of a written respirator program, and
inadequate engineering controls. The company did not perform medical evaluations, fit
testing or respirator training."

The repeat violations, with a proposed penalty of $40,200, stem from an inspection in
1998, and include lack of personal protective equipment, poor housekeeping, failure to
conduct hazard assessments and forklift and hazard communication training, and an
unguarded portable grinder. 

The serious violations, with a proposed penalty of $23,100, concern open-sided
platforms, improper installation of liquid propane gas cylinders, lack of machine guarding
and protective shield/barriers, exposed electrical apparatus and lack of safety related
electrical training.

The other-than-serious violations, which carry no penalty, include unmarked exits,
improper storage of compressed gas cylinders, defective ladders and several electrical
violations.

Willful violations are those committed with an intentional disregard of, or plain indifference
to, the requirements of the OSH act. Repeat violations occur when an employer has been
cited previously for a substantially similar condition and the citations have become final
order of the Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission. Serious violations
involve a substantial probability that death or serious physical harm could result and that
the employer knew or should have known of the hazard.

The company has 15 working days from receipt of the citations to decide to comply,
request an informal conference with the OSHA area director or to contest the citations
and proposed penalties before the Independent Occupational Safety and Health Review
Commission.

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Region 1 News Release: BOS 2001-033
Monday, March 26, 2001
Contact: Ted Fitzgerald
Phone: (617) 565-2074

OSHA PROPOSES OVER $62,000 IN FINES AGAINST BOSTON-BASED CONTRACTOR
FOR ALLEGED REPEAT SAFETY VIOLATIONS FOLLOWING INSPECTION AT NEW
BEDFORD, MASS., CONSTRUCTION SITE

The U.S. Labor Department's Occupational Safety and Health Administration has cited 
Suffolk Construction Company, Inc., of Boston, Mass., for alleged repeat violations of the 
Occupational Safety and Health Act following an inspection at a New Bedford, Mass., 
worksite. Proposed fines against the construction contractor total $62,700.

The alleged violations were discovered during an inspection of a building renovation 
project at 182 Union Street for which Suffolk is the general contractor, according to 
Brenda Gordon, OSHA area director for Boston and southeastern Massachusetts.

"The inspection found that workers were exposed to a number of safety hazards including 
potential falls from the second floor, tripping and fall hazards presented by uncleared piles 
of building and scrap materials, being struck by tools or other objects falling from 
unprotected upper work levels, and being impaled on unguarded steel rebar," said 
Gordon. 

"Of particular concern is the fact that this contractor has been cited for similar hazards 
at other jobsites several times in the past two years," she said. "While no deaths or 
serious injuries resulted from these conditions, that is in spite of, not due to, an 
employer's repeated failure to ensure that these simple, vital and legally required 
safeguards are in place and in use."

Specifically, Suffolk Construction Co., Inc., faces $62,700 in fines for five alleged repeat 
violations for:

  • two workers not using fall protection were exposed to falls of 15-feet,6-inches and 
    12-feet, 9-inches, respectively;
  • workers exposed to tripping and falling injuries from piles of building materials, scrap 
    material and lumber in work access areas;
  • workers exposed to impalement hazards from unguarded reinforcing steel;
  • workers exposed to injury from falling objects while working under and around floor 
    openings which lacked toeboards;
  • a discharged fire extinguisher had not been removed from service.

[Suffolk Construction Co., Inc., had previously been cited for violations of these safety 
standards in February 1999, March 1999, and February 2000, following inspections at 
different worksites in Boston, Mass.]

Gordon urged southeastern Massachusetts employers and employees with questions 
regarding workplace safety and health standards to contact the OSHA area office in 
Braintree at 617-565-6924. OSHA's toll-free, nationwide hotline -- 1-800-321-OSHA 
(1-800-321-6742) -- may be used to report workplace accidents or fatalities or situations 
posing imminent danger to workers, especially if they occur outside of normal business 
hours.

OSHA issues a repeat citation when an employer has previously been cited for a 
substantially similar violation and that citation and its penalty have become final.

The Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 gives OSHA the responsibility to issue 
standards that require employers to provide their employees with safe and healthful 
workplaces and jobsites, and to assure through workplace inspections that standards are 
followed. 

The company has 15 working days from receipt of the citations and proposed penalties to 
either elect to comply with them, to request and participate in an informal conference 
with the OSHA area director, or to contest them before the independent Occupational 
Safety and Health Review Commission.


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Region 4 News Release: USDOL: 01-58
Thurs., March 22, 2001
Contact: Linda McLaughlin
Phone: (770) 493-6644 ext. 0

OSHA FINES BRISTOLPIPE NEARLY $293,000 FOLLOWING ELECTROCUTION AT
GREENSBORO, GA., PLANT


The U.S. Labor Department's Occupational Safety and Health Administration has cited
Bristolpipe Corporation and proposed penalties totaling $292,600 following an
electrocution death at the company's Greensboro, Ga., plant.

Just before the accident, the victim received a non-fatal shock while trying to retrieve a
bucket of water from under the extruder, a machine that shapes plastic for sewer and
water pipes. A clogged pipe from the extruder drain pan was causing water to continually
fill the bucket and overflow onto the floor. The worker was fatally injured on his second
attempt to remove the water-filled bucket when he made electrical contact either
through the water on the floor or at the extruder machine itself.

Following an inspection of the accident, OSHA cited Bristolpipe with three willful
violations, carrying proposed penalties totaling $189,000, for failure to:
  • maintain floors of work areas in a dry condition; 
  • have a "lockout/tagout" procedure in place to ensure that machines were
    inoperable during maintenance and repair, and 
  • properly insulate splices, joints and free ends of electrical wiring. 

The agency issued willful citations in this case because the company showed "blatant
disregard of OSHA regulations and indifference to worker safety," according to William
Grimes, OSHA's Atlanta-East acting area director.

OSHA alleged that, in an effort to save time and money, management allowed inadequate
repairs of faulty electrical wiring and permitted employees to continue the risky practice
of working in standing water around numerous electrical hazards.

Grimes said, "Management was aware that machine disrepair and roof leaks were causing
water to drip onto machines and pool on the floor, sometimes accumulating several inches
deep. And workers had voiced their concerns to supervisors again and again about
electrical shocks they had received. Yet, despite the company's heightened awareness,
no effort was made to abate the hazards."

Twenty-three serious citations drew additional penalties of $90,000. These included
numerous electrical hazards, fall hazards, "lockout/tagout" deficiencies, no eye wash
stations, numerous machine guarding violations and failure to protect employees from
hazardous compressed air pressures. OSHA issues a serious citation when there is
substantial probability that death or serious physical harm could result and the employer
knew, or should have known, of the hazard.

The remaining $13,600 penalty was issued for two repeat violations -- machine guarding
and electrical hazards -- for which the company had been previously cited in August
2000.

Bristolpipe, headquartered in Bristol, Ind., employs 58 of its 218 workers at the
Greensboro, Ga., plant where PVC plastic sewer and water pipes are manufactured. The
company has 15 working days to contest OSHA's citations and proposed penalties before
the independent Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission.

Inspection of the Greensboro plant was conducted by OSHA's area office located at
LaVista Perimeter Office Park, Building 7, Suite 110, Tucker, Ga. 30084-4154; telephone:
(770) 493-6644.

OSHA urges employers and employees with questions regarding workplace safety and
health standards to contact the Atlanta area office. OSHA's toll-free, nationwide hotline -
- 1-800-321-OSHA (1-800-321-6742) - - may be used to report workplace accidents or
fatalities or situations posing imminent danger to workers, especially if they occur outside
normal business hours.


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Region 4 News Release: USDOL: 01-50
Thurs., March 15, 2001
Contact: Ramona Morris
Phone: (205) 731-1534 ext. 0

OSHA PROPOSES $123,200 PENALTY FOR SAFETY VIOLATIONS FOUND AT
HUNTSVILLE TRENCHING SITE

The U.S. Labor Department's Occupational Safety and Health Administration has cited
Shelby Contracting Co., Inc., and proposed penalties totaling $123,200 for safety
violations at an excavation site in Huntsville, Ala.

OSHA's inspection began after one of the agency's compliance safety and health officers
observed workers installing a manhole in an unprotected, 29-foot deep trench.

Following an inspection of the job site, OSHA cited the company for two willful violations
of trenching standards for allowing employees to work in a trench with no adequate
protective system and no safe means of exiting the excavation. The two willful citations
carry proposed penalties totaling $112,000. 

"To ensure worker safety in excavations over five feet deep, walls must be sloped or
shored or trench shields or boxes must be used," said Ramona Morris, acting area director
for OSHA's Birmingham office. "Failure to provide some kind of protective system exposes
employees to the risk of cave-ins. Too many workers are trapped or killed when
management makes the decision to shortcut safety."

Morris added, "In this case, employees were also placed at risk of falling back into the
trench as they tried to exit it." OSHA inspectors observed that the exit ladder at the
worksite fell short of a ramp going to the top of the trench. This left workers in the
hazardous position of having to climb on all four limbs for four to six feet along the trench
wall to reach the ramp.

In addition to the two willful citations, one repeat violation drew a proposed fine of
$11,200 for failing to have a competent person inspect the trench. OSHA cited the
company for a similar violation in 1999.

In explaining OSHA's reason for issuing willful citations in this case, Morris said, "This
employer was aware of the highly hazardous nature of trench work and knew this
particular trench was unsafe but failed to take any action to protect workers whose lives
were at risk."

OSHA defines a willful violation as one committed with an intentional disregard of, or plain
indifference to, the requirements of the OSH Act and regulations.

Huntsville-based Shelby Contracting employs about 120 workers primarily in water, sewer
and pipeline construction. The company has 15 working days to contest OSHA's citations
and proposed penalties before the independent Occupational Safety and Health Review
Commission.

Inspection of the worksite was conducted by OSHA's area office located at Vestavia
Village, 2047 Canyon Rd., Birmingham, Ala. 35216; telephone: (205) 731-1534.

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Region 2 News Release: NY 118
March 9, 2001
Contact: Chester J. Fultz
Phone: 212-337-2319

BROOKLYN, NEW YORK, HOSPITAL CITED BY OSHA FOR ALLEGED
SAFETY VIOLATIONS; $79,000 IN PENALTIES PROPOSED


The U.S. Labor Department's Occupational Safety and Health Administration has cited
Long Island College Hospital, 339-397 Hicks Street, Brooklyn, New York, and proposed
penalties of $79,000 for two alleged repeat violations and 20 alleged serious violations of
OSHA standards. The hospital has until March 29 to contest the citations.

According to OSHA area director Richard Mendelson, the action results from an
investigation conducted from November 14 through March 7 following an employee
complaint of unsafe conditions in the maintenance areas of the hospital's physical plant.

The hospital was cited for two alleged repeat violations, carrying a total proposed penalty
of $25,000, for low headroom in a fire exit access hallway and door and for exposed
electrical connections. A repeat violation is one for which an employer has been
previously cited for the same or a substantially similar condition and the citation has
become a final order of the Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission. Long
Island College Hospital was previously cited for these conditions in March, 2000.

The alleged serious violations for which the employer was cited included:
  • failure to cover holes and openings in floors; 
  • failure to provide stairs where there was a break in floor level ranging from 24
    inches to 42 inches; 
  • permitting wood and other material to be stored less than 18 inches from sprinkler
    head; 
  • failure to correct a fire door with a hole in it; 
  • failure to keep all fire exits unobstructed; 
  • failure to block abandoned elevator and dumbwaiter shaftways, which in the event
    of fire would carry smoke from floor to floor and act as chimneys; 
  • failure to post exit signs; 
  • failure to provide maintenance personnel with hard hats and to assess other
    personal protective equipment needs; 
  • failure to assess the confined-space hazard presented by crawlways containing
    wiring, lines for oxygen and other medical gasses, and other utilities; 
  • deficiencies in regard to elevators in the hospital's lockout-tagout program designed
    to prevent the accidental start-up of equipment being repaired or serviced; 
  • failure to maintain fire extinguishers in fully charged condition and in visible
    locations; 
  • using extension cords as permanent wiring. 

The serious violations carry a total proposed penalty of $54,000.

A serious violation is defined as a condition which exists where there is a substantial
possibility that death or serious physical harm can result.

The investigation was conducted by OSHA's Manhattan area office, located at 6 World
Trade Center, room 881, New York, New York, telephone (212) 466-2481.


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Region 4 News Release: USDOL: 01-31
Wednesday, March 07, 2001
Contact: William Grimes
Phone: (770) 493-6644 ext. 0

OSHA FINES NORTH CAROLINA CONTRACTOR $61,000 FOLLOWING ELECTROCUTION
AT LOGANVILLE, GA., JOB SITE

The U.S. Labor Department's Occupational Safety and Health Administration has cited
Mount Airy, N.C.-based Pike Electric, Inc., for 10 serious safety violations and proposed
penalties totaling $61,000 following the investigation of a fatal accident in Loganville, Ga.

According to William Grimes, OSHA's Atlanta-East acting area director, an employee
working in an elevated lineman's bucket was electrocuted on Sept. 11 when he came in
contact with a 14,400-volt power line.

"While upgrading an electrical system, this employee disconnected electrical feed. When
his back made contact with the de-energized primary circuit at the same instant that
contact was made with the live primary conductor, the worker was electrocuted," said
Grimes.

"Basic safety precautions -- responsible training and appropriate protective equipment --
could have saved this worker's life," added Grimes.

OSHA issues a serious citation when there is substantial probability that death or serious
physical harm could result and the employer knew, or should have known, of the hazard.

Among the serious citations issued against the company for failing to protect workers
from potential hazards were:
  • failure to properly train employees on recognition and avoidance of hazards; 
  • failure to ensure the employees were insulated or guarded from energized parts; 
  • allowing employees to work too close to conductors without protections; 
  • not assuring that an operator was at equipment controls during a stringing
    operation; 
  • not providing properly grounded equipment; 
  • failure to properly guard belts, pulleys and chains, and 
  • failure to inspect live-line tools before use, remove defective tools from service,
    and assure that tools had proper certification ratings. 

Pike Electric, Inc. does contract work throughout the South and mid-West. Prior to this
inspection, federal OSHA and state occupational safety and health agencies had
conducted over 80 inspections at company job sites, 26 of which were initiated because
of accidents or fatalities. 

The company has 15 working days to contest OSHA's citations and proposed penalties
before the independent Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission.

Inspection of the Loganville job site was conducted by OSHA's area office located at
LaVista Perimeter Office Park, Building 7, Suite 110, Tucker, Ga. 30084-4154; telephone:
(770) 493-6644.

OSHA urges employers and employees with questions regarding workplace safety and
health standards to contact the Atlanta area office. OSHA's toll-free, nationwide hotline -
- 1-800-321-OSHA (1-800-321-6742) - - may be used to report workplace accidents or
fatalities or situations posing imminent danger to workers, especially if they occur outside
normal business hours.


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Region 4 News Release: USDOL: 01-33
Wed., March 07, 2001
Contact: Gail Davis
Phone: (334) 441-6338

OSHA FINES COTTONTON, ALA., PAPER MANUFACTURING PLANT $72,650

The U.S. Labor Department's Occupational Safety and Health Administration today cited
Mead Coated Board, Inc., and proposed penalties totaling $72,650 for safety violations at
the company's Cottonton, Alabama, plant.

Inspection of the paper manufacturer began after an accidental release of hazardous
hydrogen sulfide gas caused evacuation of the mill and sent six employees to the
hospital. None were seriously injured.

OSHA cited the company for one willful violation with a $55,000 proposed penalty
because Mead did not have a written lockout procedure for shutting down, during
maintenance, tanks containing hazardous chemicals. The company failed to meet its own
requirement that each piece of equipment have a specific, written lockout process. The
paper industry routinely uses lockout procedures to ensure that machinery remains
inoperable during maintenance and repair.

In addition to being cited for not having specific written lockout checklists, Mead
received a repeat citation with a penalty of $10,000 for failure to perform the lockout
procedures that would have isolated and de-energized the tanks while they were
undergoing maintenance. The citation was categorized as repeat because the company
had been cited previously for a substantially similar hazard. 

"The gas leak occurred in the chemical recovery tank farm, an area of the mill where
by-products of the paper manufacturing process are stored," said Lana Graves, OSHA's
Mobile area director. Graves explained that acidic brine from one storage tank mixed with
black liquor from another tank generating hydrogen sulfide. "The hazardous vapor was
released into the air because the tanks had not been properly ‘locked out' prior to an
outside contractor commencing work on them."

Graves added, "We issued a willful citation against Mead because the company's failure to
act showed blatant disregard for OSHA lockout standards, particularly since outside
contractors had, on several occasions, noted the absence of specific lockout procedures
for certain equipment," said Graves.

Five serious citations accounted for the remaining $7,650 in proposed penalties. These
included: 
  • deficiencies in the company's emergency response plan; 
  • failure to identify and evaluate respiratory hazards, like hydrogen sulfide; 
  • failure to provide respirators for employees working where hazardous vapors could
    be generated; 
  • not conducting annual audits of the lockout program, and 
    failing to inform outside contractors about hazardous chemicals in their work area. 

OSHA defines a willful violation as one committed with an intentional disregard of, or plain
indifference to, the requirements of the OSH Act and regulations.

A serious violation is one in which there is a substantial probability that death or serious
physical harm could result and that the employer knew or should have known of the
hazard.

Mead Coated Board has 15 working days to contest OSHA's citations and proposed
penalties before the independent Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission.

The inspection of the plant was conducted by OSHA's area office located at 3737
Government Boulevard, Suite 100, Mobile, Ala. 36693; telephone: (334) 441-6131.

OSHA urges employers and employees with questions regarding workplace safety and
health standards to contact the Atlanta area office. OSHA's toll-free, nationwide hotline
-- 1-800-321-OSHA (1-800-321-6742) -- may be used to report workplace accidents or
fatalities or situations posing imminent danger to workers, especially if they occur outside
normal business hours.


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__________________________________  FEBRUARY 2001

.

 

TRADE NEWS RELEASE
Tuesday, February 27, 2001
Contact: Bill Wright
Phone: (202) 693-1999

KANSAS GRAIN STORAGE COMPANY SETTLES SAFETY AND HEALTH VIOLATIO
NS

Owners of a Kansas grain storage facility paid $685,000 in penalties for safety and health
violations at its Haysville grain elevator as part of a final settlement agreement approved
by an administrative law judge, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration
announced today.

DeBruce Grain, Inc. was cited by OSHA on Dec. 7, 1998, for violations of the grain
handling standard that triggered an explosion at the Haysville facility on June 8, 1998.
That explosion killed seven workers and injured ten others.

"This settlement cannot replace the lives lost nor make up for the pain suffered by those
injured in that catastrophic accident almost three years ago," said Secretary of Labor
Elaine L. Chao. "But, it does show that DeBruce management wants to do the right thing
by resolving this matter so they can continue to work toward eliminating safety hazards
at their worksites and better protect their employees."

The agreement settles citations issued against the company that included hazards
related to dust collection systems, the storage of flammable and combustible materials,
machine guarding violations, and violations of the respiratory protection and
recordkeeping standards.

DeBruce Grain, Inc. employs 250 workers at facilities in Nebraska, Texas, Iowa, and
Kansas. The DeBruce facilities have a combined capacity of 44 million bushels of grain.
The half mile-long facility at Haysville (southwest of Wichita) is the largest in the world
under one head house, with a total storage capacity of 24 million bushels.

(NOTE: A group of independent consultants, including six experts in grain elevator
explosions, was commissioned by OSHA to compile a report on the explosion. An
executive summary of that report is available on OSHA's web site at:
http://www.osha-slc.gov/html/hot_6.html

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Region 4 News Release: USDOL: 01-29
Monday, Feb. 26, 2001
Contact: Susan Johnston
Phone: (770) 984-8700

OSHA CITES CONTRACTORS FOLLOWING FATAL ACCIDENT AT ACWORTH, GA,
CONSTRUCTION SITE

The Labor Department's Occupational Safety and Health Administration today cited a
Georgia general contractor and three sub-contractors following a fatal fall at an Acworth
construction site. The four were charged with seven serious and four repeat safety
violations with proposed penalties totaling $48,600.

According to Susan Johnston, OSHA's Atlanta-West area director, the accident occurred
Nov. 10 when an employee of Victor Javier Campos, one of the sub-contractors on the
site, fell 28 feet from the roof of a three-story apartment building under construction.
The employee died four days later.

Following an inspection, OSHA cited the four contractors for failing to protect employees
working six feet or more above the ground and for failing to conduct frequent inspections
of the worksite. The violations were classified as serious for general contractor J.
Andrews Construction Co. and sub-contractor Victor Javier Campos, but as repeat with
regard to the two other sub-contractors -- Antonio Ruiz and Charles M Paine, Inc. --
because both had been inspected and fined by OSHA in February 1998 for the same
violations.

Additional serious citations were issued against Ruiz and Campos for failing to train
employees about fall hazards and protection against them.

"Falls are a leading cause of injuries and fatalities in the construction industry," said
Johnston. "Many serious injuries and deaths could be prevented if employers would
develop effective fall protection programs, including hazard assessments, use of proper
equipment to control the hazard of falls, establishing trustworthy anchor points for
guardrails and lifelines, and implementing sound work rules." 

Johnston added, "Educating employees in how to protect themselves is an extremely
important part of a responsible fall protection program, and the training should be
frequently reinforced."

A repeat violation occurs when an employer has been cited previously for a substantially
similar condition and the citation has become a final order of the Occupational Safety and
Health Review Commission.

A serious violation is one in which there is substantial probability that death or serious
physical harm could result and that the employer knew of or should have known of the
hazard.

All four companies have 15 working days to contest the OSHA citations and proposed
penalties before the independent Occupational Safety and Health Review Board.

Inspection of the worksite was conducted by OSHA's Atlanta-West area office located at
2400 Herodian Way, Suite 250, Smyrna, Ga., 30080-2968; telephone: (770) 984-8700. 

For additional safety information or assistance in developing a fall protection program,
contact the Atlanta -West area office. OSHA's toll-free, nationwide hotline --
1-800-321-OSHA (1-800-321-6742) -- may be used to report workplace accidents or
fatalities or situations posing imminent danger to workers, especially if they occur outside
normal business hours.

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Region 2 News Release: NY 116
February 26, 2001
Contact: Chester J. Fultz
PHONE: 212-337-2319

NEWARK, NEW JERSEY MATTRESS COMPANY CITED BY OSHA FOR ALLEGED WILLFUL
AND OTHER SAFETY VIOLATIONS; $154,000 IN PENALTIES PROPOSED


The U.S. Labor Department's Occupational Safety and Health Administration has cited
Mattressonic, Inc., of 354 Thomas Street, Newark, New Jersey, and proposed penalties of
$154,000 against the firm, alleging two willful, thirty-two serious, and five
other-than-serious violations of OSHA standards.

The citations result from an inspection of the facility conducted from August 23, 2000, to
February 21, 2001, following a formal employee complaint to OSHA. The firm employs 60
workers.

"This employer allowed its employees to work without proper eye protection knowing that
workers were at risk of serious injury from flying projectiles such as industrial staples and
wood shards", said David Ippolito, area director of OSHA's Parsippany area office. "The
company also had been put on notice by OSHA that it was required to properly guard its
machinery and use appropriate signs to make employees aware of the dangers of
amputation from working with unguarded equipment."

OSHA cited the company for failure to ensure that employees wore eye protection, and
for failure to guard quilting machines, two alleged willful violations carrying a total
proposed penalty of $87,500.

Among the alleged serious violations for which OSHA also cited the company are:
  • failure to ensure employees wore necessary hearing protection.
  • failure to establish a respiratory protection program.
  • failure to prevent employee over-exposure to the toxic chemical methylene
    chloride and failure to provide proper training, respiratory protection and medical
    surveillance for employees exposed to methylene chloride and other hazardous
    chemicals.
  • failure to establish and implement a lock-out/tag-out program to prevent the
    unexpected start-up of dangerous machinery.
  • failure to properly train employees to safely operate industrial fork lift trucks.
  • failure to properly guard the point of operation on a trash compactor.
  • failure to provide a shut-off mechanism for a band saw.
  • failure to properly guard machinery, including transmission belts, chains, pulleys
    and prockets.

The alleged serious violations carry a total proposed penalty of $$64,500.

The employer was additionally cited for five other-than-serious violations carrying a total
proposed penalty of $2,000.

A willful violation is defined by OSHA as one committed with an intentional disregard for,
or plain indifference to, the requirements of the OSH Act and regulations. A serious
violation is defined as a condition which exists where there is a substantial possibility that
death or serious physical harm can result.

The investigation was conducted by OSHA's Parsippany area office, located at 299 Cherry
Hill Road, suite 304, Parsippany, New Jersey, telephone (973) 263-1003.

The company has until March 14 to contest the citations.


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Region 1 News Release: BOS 2001-022
Monday, February 26, 2001
Contact: John M. Chavez
Phone: (617) 565-2075

OSHA CITES MERIDEN, CONNECTICUT, EMPLOYER FOR ALLEGED WORKPLACE
SAFETY & HEALTH VIOLATIONS; PROPOSES OVER $92,000 IN PENALTIES

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration of the U.S. Department of Labor has
cited AGC, Inc. of 140 Evansville Ave., Meriden, Conn., for alleged serious and other
violations of the Occupational Safety and Health Act, and has proposed penalties totaling
$92,050 for those violations.

OSHA initiated safety and health inspections of the AGC facilities, which manufacture
aircraft engine component parts, on Oct. 12, 2000, under the Site Specific Targeting
Program which focuses on workplaces with exceptionally high injury and illness rates.

"Using 1998 data, the average lost workday injury and illness rate for all industries
throughout the country was 3.1 per hundred workers. The rate for the AGC plant was
15.92 per hundred workers in that same period," said Clifford S. Weston, OSHA area
director in Bridgeport.

Both inspections concluded on Nov. 15, 2000.

Weston noted that the violations found during the safety inspection include deficiencies
such as lack of guard railings, obstructed means of egress, problems with material
handling equipment, machine guarding and electrical hazards, as well as insufficient
means for controlling the lock out of hazardous energy sources. In all, the company is
being cited for 33 alleged serious safety violations carrying proposed penalties totaling
$71,050.

In addition, Weston said the health inspection revealed serious violations involving: lack
of hearing conservation program and engineering controls for noise overexposures; lack of
a hazard assessment for personal protective equipment; lack of appropriate respirator
program; inadequate emergency eyewashes; inadequate training concerning hazardous
chemicals, more specifically, hydrofluoric acid; hazards associated with cadmium; and the
lack of protection for first aid responders where no exposure control plan was in place
and employees were not offered the Hepatitis B vaccination. AGC is being cited for 12
alleged serious health violations, including proposed penalties totaling $18,900.

Three other-than-serious violations found during the health inspection address:
recordkeeping deficiencies, personal protective equipment and lack of updated material
safety data sheets. Those alleged violations include a proposed penalty of $2,100.

Weston said numerous individual hazards were found in the workplace, with most of the
citations containing groupings of multiple instances of alleged violations.

He urged Connecticut employers and employees with questions regarding safety and
health standards to contact the OSHA area offices in Bridgeport or Hartford. He added
that OSHA's toll-free nationwide hotline -- 1-800-321-OSHA (1-800-321-6742) -- may be
used to report workplace accidents and fatalities or situations posing imminent danger to
workers, especially those situations which occur outside of normal business hours.

A serious violation is defined by OSHA as one in which there is substantial probability that
death or serious physical harm could result, and the employer knew, or should have
known, of the hazard.

An other-than-serious violation is a condition which would probably not cause death or
serious physical harm, but would have a direct and immediate impact on the safety and
health of employees.

The Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 gives OSHA the responsibility to issue
standards and rules requiring employers to provide their employees with safe and healthful
workplaces and jobsites. Through workplace inspections, OSHA assures that standards
are followed.

The company has 15 working days from receipt of the citations and proposed penalties to
either elect to comply with them, request and participate in an informal conference with
the OSHA area director, or contest them before the independent Occupational Safety and
Health Review Commission.

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Region 4 News Release: USDOL: 01-27
Friday, Feb. 23, 2001
Contact: Ramona Morris
Phone: (205) 731-1534 ext.0

OSHA PROPOSES $181,200 PENALTY FOLLOWING FATAL ACCIDENT AT ANNISTON
FOUNDRY

The Labor Department's Occupational Safety and Health Administration has cited Union
Foundry Company, Anniston, Ala., and proposed penalties totaling $181,200 for serious,
willful and repeat safety and health violations following the investigation of an Aug. 22
fatality at the plant.

The accident happened when an employee was caught in an unguarded conveyor pulley
while he attempted to unclog a sand chute nearby. "This tragic accident could easily
have been prevented if the employer had adopted standard safety procedures that guard
workers from hazards associated with moving machine parts," said Ramona Morris, acting
director of OSHA's Birmingham area office.

Following a safety inspection, OSHA proposed a penalty of $70,000 for one willful citation
in connection with the unguarded conveyor pulley.

"A willful citation results in cases where there appears to be an intentional disregard of,
or plain indifference to, the requirements of the OSH act and regulations," Morris
explained. "In this case, the conveyor pulley's guard had been removed three months
earlier when the machinery was relocated while new equipment was installed. The guard
was never replaced even though it was sitting near the machine in plain view."

Morris added, "We issued a willful citation against Union Foundry because no effort was
made to assure the safety of workers even though management was aware that an
unguarded conveyor could result in serious injury or death. In fact, only months before, a
worker had been killed in a similar accident in a Tyler, Texas, plant owned by the same
parent company that owns the Anniston foundry." 

The safety inspection resulted in an additional $58,500 penalty for 17 serious citations
for: electrical violations, including unmarked and open circuit breakers; an unguarded pit
opening; other unguarded machines, and operating a crane without clearly marked load
rates and audible warning devices.

The agency also cited two repeat safety violations with total penalties of $12,500 for
operating defective powered industrial trucks and failing to ground electrical equipment.
Both violations had been cited previously following OSHA inspections of the company in
1999.

A health inspection was initiated, shortly after the fatality investigation began, as part of
OSHA's national emphasis program for silica. This inspection resulted in seven serious
health violations with proposed penalties totaling $40,000. Violations included failure to
follow silica dust standards and not providing personal protective equipment to employees
exposed to noise and chemical hazards.

A serious violation, whether the result of a safety or health inspection, is one in which
there is a substantial probability that death or serious physical harm could result and that
the employer knew or should have known of the hazard.

Union Foundry employs approximately 400 workers at the Anniston location. The company
has 15 working days to contest OSHA's citations and proposed penalties before the
independent Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission.

The inspection was conducted by OSHA's area office located at Vestavia Village, 2047
Canyon Rd., Birmingham, Ala. 35216; telephone: (205) 731-1534.

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Region 6 News Release: USDL-OSHA-01-19-2-23
Friday, Feb. 23, 2001
Contact: Diana Petterson
Phone: (214) 767-4776, ext. 222

OSHA PROPOSES $161,550 PENALTY AGAINST MICHAEL ANGELO'S GOURMET
FOODS, INC., IN AUSTIN FOR ALLEGED SAFETY VIOLATIONS.

The federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration has cited Michael Angelo's
Gourmet Foods, Inc., in Austin, Texas, with 34 alleged safety violations and proposed
penalties totaling $161,550, announced the U.S. Department of Labor.

Michael Angelo's Gourmet Foods is a frozen food manufacturer that employs about 615
workers in North Austin.

The alleged safety violations were discovered during an OSHA inspection that began Aug.
24, 2000 by a referral from an OSHA health inspector after a release of ammonia at the
plant on Aug. 8, 2000. In a separate health investigation, OSHA issued $220,950 in
proposed penalties to the company on Feb. 5 for 21 alleged health violations resulting
from the ammonia release.

The company was cited for two willful, 20 alleged serious and 12 other-than-serious
safety violations. The two willful violations involved failing to provide training and proper
lockout/tagout procedures during cleaning and maintaining of machines to ensure that the
energy sources from the machines could not be restarted; and failing to properly guard
moving parts of machinery. Willful violations are those committed with an intentional
disregard of, or plain indifference to, the requirements of the Occupational Safety &
Health Act and regulations.

The company was also cited with 20 alleged serious safety violations, some of which
include failing to follow federal regulations regarding process safety management of the
ammonia system, control of hazardous energy while servicing machines, machine
guarding, electrical hazards and other safety issues. A serious violation is one in which
there is a substantial probability that death or serious physical harm could result and the
employer knew or should have known of the hazard.

The 12 alleged other-than-serious safety violations involve hazardous conditions that
would probably not cause death or serious physical harm but would have a direct and
immediate relationship to the safety and health of employees.

The Aug. 11, 2000 investigation regarding the 21 alleged health citations, issued to the
company on Feb. 5, was in response to an evacuation an ammonia release that resulted
in 12 food production workers requiring medical attention. The ammonia release occurred
on Aug. 8, 2000.

The three alleged willful violations of OSHA's health standards include failing to provide
personal protective equipment, failing to provide training in response to hazardous
chemical releases and failing to maintain a permitting system to ensure that employees
entering confined spaces could not be overcome by hazardous atmospheres. The 18
alleged serious health violations involve failing to follow hazardous waste and emergency
response preparation, respiratory protection standards and permit required confined
space provisions.

"OSHA investigators found machine safety interlocks deliberately bypassed in order to
speed up production and maintenance work on machinery that was not properly locked
out of service putting employees at risk for amputations and other serious injuries," said
Paul L. Brantley, OSHA area director in Austin. "Preventable injuries were occurring in the
plant and the employer did not take prompt corrective action to reduce these injuries."

Michael Angelo's Gourmet Foods has 15 working days from the receipt of the citations to
either comply, request and participate in an informal conference with the OSHA Austin
area director, or contest the citations and penalties before the independent Occupational
Safety and Health Review Commission.

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Region 9 News Release: USDL-14
February 21, 2001
Contact: Deanne Amaden
Phone: 415-975-4741

Pago Pago Firm Fined for Hazardous Work Conditions
OSHA investigation follows worker fatality

SAN FRANCISCO - The Occupational Safety and Health Administration has cited a
concrete block manufacturer for three serious violations of federal health and safety laws
following an investigation into the death of a worker at the company's manufacturing
facility at Daniel Inoyue Industrial Park in Tafuna.

CBT Lumber & Hardware, Inc., of Pago Pago, American Samoa, received the OSHA
citation and was assessed $13,500 in penalties for several safety violations, including
serious violations for failing to guard the concrete mixer's rotating blades, which caused
the injury, and failing to follow standard lockout/tagout procedures to prevent the
start-up of the mixer's blades during cleaning, which also contributed to the accident.

The OSHA investigation of CBT Lumber & Hardware was prompted by the November 15,
2000 death of an employee, 48 year old Paituli Malakai, who was chipping and cleaning
hard concrete out of the mixer's tub when his leg was amputated by the blades of a
concrete mixing machine. 

Upon inspecting the facility, OSHA inspectors found additional violations unrelated to the
worker's death. OSHA issued citations for serious violations for the failure to have
machine guards on portable tools, conveyor belt pulleys and drive belt pulleys. OSHA also
issued a citation for other-than-serious violations which included failure to have stair rails
and guardrails on platforms and lack of proper electrical connections and covers.

OSHA cites for serious violations only when there is substantial probability that death or
serious physical harm could result, and the employer either knew, or should have known,
of the hazard.

The company has 15 working days from the date of the notice to contest the citations.

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Region 2 News Release: NY 114
February 13, 2001
Contact: Chester J. Fultz
Phone: 212-337-2319

OSHA CITES LINDEN, NEW JERSEY MANUFACTURER FOR ALLEGED
SAFETY AND HEALTH VIOLATIONS; $78,000 IN PENALTIES PROPOSED


The U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety & Health Administration has cited
Charles Beseler Co., of 1600 Lower Road, Linden, New Jersey and proposed penalties
totaling $78,000 against the firm., alleging thirty-four serious and five other-than-serious
violations of OSHA standards. The company has until February 27 to contest the
citations.

According to Robert D. Kulick, OSHA area director, the citations resulted from a safety
and a health inspection conducted from August 18, 2000, through January 26, 2001,
following an employee complaint.

Following the two inspections, OSHA cited the company for a total of thirty-four alleged
serious violations, including:
  • failure to provide adequate fall protection during lifting operations when using fork
    lifts; and failure to provide forklift training and training certification to employees.
  • failure to maintain fire alarm systems.
  • failure to properly identify and arrange emergency exits.
  • failure to properly store and clean up combustible liquids and waste products.
  • failure to ensuring that employees used proper eye and face protection.
  • failure to implement a lockout/tagout program to prevent unexpected start-up of
    machinery and equipment.
  • failure to provide employees with fire extinguisher training.
  • failure to provide hazard communication training to employees.
  • failure to properly guard machinery.
  • failure to properly store oxygen and fuel-gas cylinders.
  • failure to properly maintain, label and guard electrical equipment.

The alleged serious violations carry a total proposed penalty of $76,400.

The employer was also cited for alleged other than serious violations, including:

  • failure to maintain safety eyewash in sanitary operating condition.
  • failure to have a respirator program.
  • failure to monitor employees for lead exposure.
  • failure to train employees about the hazards of working with lead.

The alleged other-than-serious violations carry a total proposed penalty of $1,600.

A serious violation is defined as a condition which exists where there is substantial
probability that death or serious physical harm can result. An other than serious violation
is one in which the hazard would not result in death or serious physical harm.

The investigation was conducted by OSHA's Avenel Area Office, located at 1030 St.
Georges Avenue, Suite 205, Avenel, New Jersey 07001, telephone 732-750-3270.
The company has 15 working days from the date of the notice to contest the citations.


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Region 3 News Release: USDL: III-01-02-12-017-PA
Mon., Feb. 12, 2001
Contact: Leni Uddyback-Fortson
Office: (215) 879-0127

FALCON PLASTICS CITED FOR ALLEGED SAFETY AND HEALTH VIOLATIONS; OSHA
PROPOSES $161,000 IN PENALTIES


The U.S. Department of Labor has cited Falcon Plastics, Washington, Pa. for alleged
violations of the Occupational Safety and Health Act, proposing $161,000 in penalties.
Falcon Plastics is a plastics products manufacturer employing 220 people.

OSHA initiated an inspection on Aug. 17, 2000 in response to a complaint filed after an
employee suffered amputation of several fingers. This was the second accident involving
amputation suffered by a Falcon employee within a five-month period.

According to Robert Szymanski, area director of the OSHA Pittsburgh office, the company
was issued two willful violations, carrying a penalty of $112,000; 15 serious violations,
carrying a penalty of $49,000; and seven other-than-serious violations, which carry no
penalty.

"These two unfortunate incidents occurred because Falcon Plastics allowed its employees
to work on unguarded machinery, without use of the hand tools" says Szymanski, "Proper
guarding must be employed immediately to prevent future tragedies from occurring."

The willful violations were issued because of the company's failure to guard machinery
and failure to provide special hand tools designed to protect machine operators from
inadvertently making contact with the machine.

Serious violations included:
  • lack of personal protective equipment 
  • lack of machine guarding 
  • exposed electrical parts 
  • improper use of powered industrial trucks 
  • deficient Lock Out/Tag Out program–prevents inadvertent machine start-up 
    improper storage of compressed gas cylinders 

Other-than-serious violations were due to the company's deficient recordkeeping, poor
housekeeping and failure to provide hazard communication training.

Willful violations are those committed with an intentional disregard of, or plain indifference
to, the requirements of the OSH Act and regulations.

A serious violation involves a substantial probability that death or serious physical harm
could result and that the employer knew or should have known of the hazard.

The company has 15 working days from receipt of the citations to either decide to
comply, request an informal conference with the OSHA area director, or to contest the
citations and proposed penalties before the independent Occupational Safety and Health
Review Commission

The investigation was conducted by the Pittsburgh OSHA office, Federal Building, Room
1428, 1000 Liberty Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa. 15222-4101. Phone: (412) 395-4903.


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Region 4 News Release: USDOL: 01-16
Mon., Feb. 12, 2001
Contact: Terry Bailey
Phone: (205)731-1534

OSHA CITES ALABAMA FIRM FOR OVER-EXPOSING EMPLOYEES TO METHYLENE
CHLORIDE


The U.S. Labor Department's Occupational Safety and Health Administration has cited
Alaco Sales, Inc., for 12 serious health violations and proposed penalties totaling $27,000
for over-exposing employees to high levels of methylene chloride at the company's
Russellville plant.

According to Terry Bailey, OSHA's Birmingham assistant area director, the investigation
began Nov. 16, following a compliant filed with the agency about a process at the facility
which uses an adhesive containing 60 percent methylene chloride. The agency found that
six employees --- who wore no respiratory or eye protection --- were exposed to as
much as 14 times the permissible exposure level during a spraying operation to attach a
layer of batting to foam cushions.

"Employees must be protected when they work with hazardous chemical," Bailey said.
"Fortunately, someone alerted us to the problem at this facility and we were able to take
action."

In addition to violations of the permissible exposure levels, the company was cited for
failure to: 
  • provide employee training on the proper use of a hazardous chemical;
  • perform a workplace assessment to determine employee exposure levels; 
  • reduce exposure levels by adequate engineering controls and/or safe work
    practices; 
  • have procedures in place to detect leaks or spills; 
  • have an emergency action plan; 
  • properly dispose of waste materials contaminated by methylene chloride. 

"Depending on the length and level of exposure to the chemical vapors, employees may
experience only minor reactions, or more serious, even fatal effects," Bailey said. "Some
medical studies suggest a possible relationship between methylene chloride exposure and
an increased risk of certain cancers."

Methylene chloride is a mild narcotic. Chronic, long-term inhalation exposure affects the
central nervous system, causing headaches, dizziness, nausea, and memory lost.
Exposure to the chemical may also cause elevated carbon monoxide levels in the blood,
particularly for workers who smoke, are anemic, or have heart disease.

A serious violation is one in which there is a substantial probability that death or serious
physical harm could result and that the employer knew or should have known of the
hazard.

The company has 15 working days to contest OSHA's citations and proposed penalties
before the independent Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission.

The investigation of this accident was conducted by OSHA's area office located at
Vestavia Village, 2047 Canyon Road, Birmingham, AL 35216-1981: telephone: (205)
731-1534.

OSHA urges employers and employees with questions regarding workplace safety and
health standards to contact the Birmingham office. OSHA's toll-free nationwide hotline,
1-800-321-6742, (1-800-321-OSHA) may be used to report workplace accidents,
fatalities or situations posing imminent danger to workers, especially if they occur outside
normal business hours.


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Region 4 News Release: USDOL: 01-14
Tues., Feb. 6, 2001
Contact: Lana Graves
Phone: (334) 441-6131

OSHA FINES CONTRACTOR $168,000 FOLLOWING ACCIDENT AT PANAMA CITY JOB
SITE

The U.S. Labor Department's Occupational Safety and Health Administration today cited
Red Simpson, Inc.(RSI), and fined the company $168,000 after two employees suffered
serious burns at a Panama City job site.

According to Lana Graves, OSHA's Mobile, Ala., area director, two RSI workers were
replacing an old power line pole with a new, taller pole when the aerial lift in which they
were working came in contact with live overhead power lines. The employees received
second and third degree burns.

"Too many Florida construction workers are injured or killed on the job," said Graves. "And
too many of the injuries and deaths are the result of electrocution accidents."

OSHA's inspection of the Panama City accident resulted in two willful and five serious
citations against RSI. Penalties totaling $140,000 were assessed for the willful violations
which included a citation for allowing employees to come too close to energized parts
without requiring them to wear "sleeves" insulated to protect their upper arms and
shoulders. The unprotected workers' proximity to overhead power lines brought metal
parts on the aerial lift in contact with live wiring which caused the accident. In addition,
one of the employees was working 55 feet above the ground without a full body harness
or other fall protection.

Tools and metal material cluttering an aerial lift, as was the case on this job site, can
lead to damage of the insulated lining of the bucket. This potential exposure to electrical
shock accounted for one of the five serious citations issued by OSHA. The other four
included failure to train workers about maintaining minimum safe distances from energized
overhead power lines and about required testing of protective rubber gloves; failure to
perform the actual tests that ensure the integrity of the insulated rubber gloves; failure
to require safety glasses when cutting wood or wires, and permitting metal parts on the
aerial lift to come in contact with live wiring. The serious citations carry penalties totaling
$28,000.

"This employer has a significant history of OSHA citations for violations involving
energized overhead power lines," said Graves. "Since 1998, RSI has been cited five times
for this type of violation and four of the five were directly related to fatalities."

Graves continued, "The company took no action at this job site to enforce its own safety
manual which addresses requirements for minimum clearance from overhead power lines
and the need for fall protection when working from aerial lifts. Employers like RSI are one
of the reasons OSHA began the CARE (Construction Accident Reduction Emphasis)
program in Florida."

In 1999, to respond to the high rate of construction accidents in the state, OSHA
launched CARE. The program follows extensive outreach activities with an equally
extensive inspection and enforcement effort. Because fall and electrocution accidents
accounted for 63 percent of the total construction fatalities in that year, the agency
introduced two new special emphasis programs under CARE, one targeting falls and the
other electrocutions.

Alexandria, Louisiana-based RSI employs approximately 1,500 workers to repair, maintain
and construct electric power. The company has 15 working days to contest OSHA's
citations and proposed penalties before the independent Occupational Safety and Health
Review Commission.

Inspection of the Panama City work site was conducted by staff from the Mobile OSHA
area office located at 3737 Government Boulevard, Suite 100, Mobile, Ala. 36693-4309;
telephone: (334) 441-6131.

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Region 6 News Release: USUSDL-OSHA-01-13-02-01
Thurs., Feb. 1, 2001
Contact: Diana Petterson or Elizabeth Todd
Phone: (214) 767-4776, ext. 222 or 221

OSHA PROPOSES $58,900 PENALTY AGAINST KOEHLER BAKERY CO. INC., NORTH
LITTLE ROCK, ARK.


The Occupational Safety and Health Administration has cited Koehler Bakery Co. Inc., in
North Little Rock, Ark., with alleged safety and health violations and proposed penalties
totaling $58,900, announced the U.S. Department of Labor.

The alleged violations resulted from a follow-up inspection that began Sept. 14, 2000.
The company was cited for three alleged serious violations, which consisted of failing to
provide covers for floor holes, failing to guard live electrical parts and failing to provide
proper electrical wiring for equipment. A serious violation is one in which there is a
substantial probability that death or serious physical harm could result. The penalties
totaled $3,900.

Additionally, the company was cited for failing to abate (correct) safety violations cited
in a previous inspection that was conducted on January 27, 1999. The violations included
improper machine guarding and failing to properly identify electrical circuits. The penalties
for failing to abate the previous violations totaled $55,000.

Koehler employs about 40 workers at its Warden Road facility in North Little Rock.

Employers or workers who have questions concerning safety and health may contact the
OSHA Little Rock area office at (501) 324-6291. They may also take advantage of the
free consultation offered by the Arkansas Department of Labor Consultation Service at
(501) 682-4520.

Koehler has 15 working days from receipt of the citations to comply, request an informal
conference with the Little Rock area director or contest the citations and penalties
before the independent Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission.

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__________________________________  JANUARY 2001

.

Region 3 News Release: USDL: III-01-01-30-013-PA/DE
Tues., Jan. 30, 2001
Contact: Kate Dugan
Office: (215) 861-5101

GENERAL CHEMICAL CORP. CITED FOR SAFETY AND HEALTH VIOLATIONS; OSHA
PROPOSES $487,000 IN PENALTIES


The U.S. Labor Department's Occupational Safety and Health Administration has cited
General Chemical Corporation Delaware Valley Works for alleged safety and health
violations at both the North plant in Marcus Hook, Pa., and the South plant in Claymont,
Del., and proposed penalties totaling $487,000.

According to Phyllis Kyner, area director of the Philadelphia OSHA office, an inspection
was initiated on Aug. 4, 2000 at the company's North plant when six employees were
hospitalized after a release of Hydrogen Fluoride. The inspection at the South plant began
on Sept. 14, 2000 as a result of a complaint. 

"The hazardous conditions found at these sites foster a continuously unsafe work
environment for General Chemical employees," said Kyner. "Immediate action must be
taken to prevent future incidents and ensure the safety and health of these workers."

The citations issued today are the result of both inspections and have been issued so
that the company is not penalized twice for the same violations found in each plant.

Eight willful violations with a proposed penalty of $365,000; 25 serious violations with a
penalty of $104,000; and, two other-than-serious violations with a penalty of $1,000
have been issued for both the North and South Plants.

Citations for four serious violations, with a proposed penalty of $17,000, were issued for
the South plant only.

A description of the alleged violations follows:

one willful violation of the process safety management standard - specifically, not
addressing the Process Hazard Analysis teams' recommendations in a timely manner,
not establishing a written schedule of correction or documenting completion of
those recommendations. More than 70 instances of the teams' recommendations
from 1991 until present were not resolved.

one willful violation of the process safety management standards - not correcting
deficiencies in equipment.

one willful violation of the confined space standard in that the company did not
ensure that all procedures specified by the permit had been conducted before
entering a hydrogen fluoride tank

one willful violation of the lockout/tagout standard for not implementing an
adequate program (lockout/tagout procedures are designed to safeguard employees
from the unexpected startup or release of stored energy in machines or equipment).

one willful eyewash and shower violation which involved defective facilities at both
plants.

three willful violations for recordkeeping for over 100 instances of not recording or
misrecording lost time in calendar years 1998, 1999 and 2000.

The serious citations cover a range of violations of the process safety management
standard; failure to notify the emergency actions team and failure to implement an
emergency response plan when an emergency occurred; various violations of the personal
protective equipment standard; confined space violations; failure to conduct periodic
inspections of energy control procedures; and, failure to train employees in the hazards
of hydrogen fluoride.

The serious citations issued to the South plant involve the process safety management
standard for failure to have operating procedures on how to deal with airborne exposure
to ammonia; problems with the mechanical integrity program; and failure to conduct
inspection of valves or repair structural defects when discovered; and failure to maintain
the hydrogen sulfide alarm in working condition.

The other-than-serious violations concern the certification of lockout/tagout training and
other procedural inadequacies.

Willful violations are those committed with an intentional disregard of, or plain indifference
to, the requirements of the Occupational Safety and Health Act and regulations. Serious
violations involve a substantial probability that death or serious physical harm could result
and that the employer knew or should have known of the hazard.

The company has 15 working days from receipt of the citations to decide to comply,
request an informal conference with the OSHA area director or contest the citations and
proposed penalties before the Independent Occupational Safety and Health Review
Commission.

The inspections were conducted by the Philadelphia OSHA office, 2nd and Chestnut St.,
Philadelphia, Pa., (215) 597-4955 and the Wilmington OSHA office, 844 N. King St., Room
2209 Caleb Boggs Federal Building, Wilmington, Del., (302) 573-6518.

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Region 1 News Release: BOS 2001-015
Tuesday, January 30, 2001
Contact: John M. Chavez
Phone: (617) 565-2075

Employer and worker awareness of carbon monoxide dangers stressed
OSHA CITES TWO EMPLOYERS FOLLOWING JANUARY 3RD CARBON MONOXIDE
OVEREXPOSURES AT CHELSEA, MASS., MEAT WHOLESALER

Following a January incident in which 13 employees of a Chelsea, Massachusetts, meat
wholesaler were overcome by carbon monoxide from a borrowed forklift truck, the U.S.
Labor Department's Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has cited the
wholesaler, James J. Derba, Inc., and the company which supplied the forklift, Big T&D
Trucking, also of Chelsea, for alleged Serious and Other than Serious violations of the
Occupational Safety and Health Act. OSHA has proposed combined penalties against the
two employers totaling $22,600.

According to Brenda Gordon, OSHA area director for Suffolk County and Southeastern
Massachusetts, the alleged violations encompass overexposure to carbon monoxide, lack
of adequate engineering controls to reduce such exposure, the use of defective forklift
trucks, lack of employee training in the safe operation of forklift trucks and pallet jacks,
and failure to maintain required employee illness and injury logs.

On January 3rd, 2001, Derba employees were using a propane-powered forklift truck
borrowed from Big T&D Trucking to help hang 200-300 pound beef sections in a meat
hanging cooler. Carbon monoxide from the truck's exhaust built up to dangerous levels in
the enclosed space of the unventilated cooler. As a result of this, the workers
experienced symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning including headaches, nausea,
dizziness, vomiting, shortness of breath and loss of consciousness. All required medical
attention.

"This was a close call, a textbook example of the dangers of carbon monoxide exposure
that clearly illustrates why employers need to take effective steps to safeguard workers,"
said Gordon. "In this case, the employees were acutely exposed to excess levels of
carbon monoxide that were potentially lethal. This forklift truck should not have been
allowed to operate in this cooler."

Gordon explained that carbon monoxide is a colorless, odorless, tasteless poisonous gas
produced by the incomplete burning of any material containing carbon, such as gasoline,
natural gas, oil, propane, coal or wood. One of the most common sources of exposure in
the workplace is the internal combustion engine. 

"Carbon monoxide is a chemical asphyxiant," she said. "Exposure to it restricts the ability
of the blood system to carry necessary oxygen to body tissues. Prolonged overexposure
to carbon monoxide can result in death or permanent damage to those parts of the body
which require a lot of oxygen, such as the heart and brain." 

Among the means of reducing carbon monoxide hazards are providing adequate ventilation
in the workplace and ensuring that fossil-fuel-powered equipment is in proper working
order so as to minimize its carbon monoxide levels. Where appropriate ventilation in
unavailable, effective controls -- for example, the use of an electric rather than a
gas-powered vehicle -- should be implemented. Cold weather can increase carbon
monoxide hazards since traditional warm weather sources of workplace ventilation --
windows, doors, vents, bays -- may be closed or sealed against low outside
temperatures.

Gordon encouraged Bay State employers seeking more information about carbon monoxide
or other workplace health and safety hazards to contact the OSHA area offices in
Braintree, Methuen or Springfield, the free employer consultation service provided by the
Commonwealth of Massachusetts' Division of Occupational Safety, private safety and
health consultants or employers' insurance carriers. An OSHA fact sheet on carbon
monoxide poisoning is available through its area offices or on line at www.osha.gov under
the News Room link.

Specifically, the citations and proposed penalties against the two employers are:

James J. Derba, Inc. faces a total of $15,600 in fines for:

Two alleged Serious violations, with $12,600 in proposed penalties, for:

  • excess levels of carbon monoxide in the forklift truck's exhaust; 
  • employees exposed to excess levels of carbon monoxide; and failure to adequately determine
    engineering controls to reduce carbon monoxide hazards in a location (the meat
    hanging cooler) where ventilation was unavailable;
  • failure to train employees in the safe operations of powered pallet jacks and the
    forklift; failure to certify employee pallet jack and forklift training and evaluation.

One alleged Other than Serious violation, with a propose penalty of $3,000, for:

  • failure to maintain an illness and injury log.

Big T&D Trucking faces $7,000 in fines for:

Two alleged Serious violations, with $5,000 in proposed penalties, for:

  • failure to ensure that operators had been adequately trained and evaluated in the
    safe operation of forklift trucks; failure to certify operator training and evaluation;
  • excess levels of carbon monoxide measured in the exhaust from two forklift
    trucks; 
  • two defective forklift trucks not removed from service for repairs.

One alleged Other than Serious violation, with a $2,000 penalty proposed, for:
failure to maintain an illness and injury log.

A serious violation is defined by OSHA as one in which there is a substantial probability
that death or serious physical harm could result, and the employer knew, or should have
known, of the hazard. An other-than-serious violation is a condition which would probably
not cause death or serious physical harm but would have a direct and immediate
relationship to the safety and health of employees.

OSHA is empowered by the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 to issue
standards and rules requiring employers to provide their employees with safe and healthful
workplaces and jobsites, and to assure through workplace inspections that those
standards are followed.

James J. Derba, Inc. is located at One Griffin Way in Chelsea and employs 43 workers. Big
T&D Trucking, located at 128 Eastern Avenue in Chelsea, employs 30 workers.

Each company has 15 working days from receipt of its citations and proposed penalties to
either elect to comply with them, to request and participate in an informal conference
with the OSHA area director, or to contest them before the independent Occupational
Safety and Health Review Commission.


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Region 2 News Release: NY 110
January 25, 2001
Contact: Chester J. Fultz
PHONE: 212-337-2319

BRONX, NEW YORK, RECYCLING COMPANY CITED BY OSHA FOR ALLEGED SAFETY
AND HEALTH VIOLATIONS; $94,880 IN PENALTIES PROPOSED


The U.S. Labor Department's Occupational Safety and Health Administration has cited
Hunts Point Recycling Corporation, of 342 Casanova Street, Bronx, New York, and
proposed penalties of $94,880 against the firm for one alleged willful violation, eleven
alleged repeat violations, nine alleged serious violations, and one alleged
other-than-serious violation of OSHA standards. The company has until February 15 to
contest the citations.

According to OSHA area director Philip Peist, the action results from an investigation
conducted from July 25, 2000 through January 18, 2001 following a complaint about a
lack of personal protective equipment at the company, which operates a garbage transfer
station and recycling center.

OSHA alleges that the company willfully violated OSHA's protective equipment standard
by failing to ensure that employees use appropriate eye protection. The alleged willful
violation carries a proposed penalty of $36,000.

The firm was also cited for eleven alleged repeat violations, carrying a proposed penalty
of $42,880, including:
  • failure to prevent employees from walking/working on moving conveyor belts;
  • failure to develop specific lockout-tagout procedures and appropriate training to
    prevent the accidental start-up of machines being serviced or maintained;
  • failure to have a hearing conservation program and ensure that employees wear
    hearing protection;
  • failure to ensure that employees wear hand protection;
  • failure to supply lavatories with soap and towels;
  • failure to guard stairways and open-sided floors.

A repeat violation is one for which an employer has been previously cited for the same or
a substantially similar condition and the citation has become a final order of the
Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission. The company was previously cited
for these conditions in April, 1998.

The alleged serious violations for which the employer was cited included:

  • failure to provide handrails on stairs;

  • failure to provide exit signs and maintain unobstructed access to exits;

  • failure to conduct noise monitoring;

  • failure to ensure that employees driving front-end loaders use seat belts;

  • failure to provide a fixed stair for safe access onto work platform;

  • failure to maintain a metal ladder in good condition;

  • failure to replace an electric cable with exposed bare conductors;

  • failure to provide an adjustable tongue guard for an abrasive wheel.

The alleged serious violations carry a total proposed penalty of $16,000.

OSHA also cited the firm for failure to re-train workers on lift truck safety when a new
model of fork-lift vehicle was put into use, an alleged other-than-serious violation.

A willful violation is defined by OSHA as one committed with an intentional disregard for,
or plain indifference to, the requirements of the OSHA act and regulations. A serious
violation is defined as a condition which exists where there is a substantial possibility that
death or serious physical harm can result. An other-than-serious violation is a hazardous
condition that would probably not cause death or serious physical harm but would have a
direct and immediate relationship to the safety and health of employees.

The investigation was conducted by OSHA's Tarrytown area office, located at 660 White
Plains Road, Tarrytown, New York, telephone (914) 524-7510.


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Region 6 News Release: USDL-OSHA-01-12-01-24
Wed., Jan. 24, 2001
Contact: Diana Petterson or Elizabeth Todd
Phone: (214) 767-4776, ext. 222 or 221

OSHA CITES SAW PIPES USA INC., BAYTOWN, TEXAS, FOR ALLEGED WORKPLACE
SAFETY VIOLATIONS; PROPOSES $82,000 IN PENALTIES


The Occupational Safety and Health Administration has cited Saw Pipes USA Inc., in
Baytown, Texas, for alleged serious, repeat and other safety violations of the
Occupational Safety and Health Act, and proposed penalties totaling $82,000, announced
the U.S. Department of Labor. 

The OSHA Houston North area office began an inspection of the company's facilities on
Oct. 30, 2000 and found 32 alleged serious violations in the plant, including unguarded
machinery, unguarded floor holes, open-sided-floors, exposed electrical parts, serious
deficiencies with overhead cranes, and serious deficiencies in the control of hazardous
energy. A serious violation is defined as one in which there is a substantial probability
that death or serious physical harm could result and the employer knew, or should have
known, of the hazard. 

The company was also cited for one alleged repeat violation for housekeeping and one
alleged other than-serious violation for ladder safety. A repeat violation is defined as one
where, upon re-inspection, a substantially similar violation is found. An other-than-serious
violation is a condition, which would probably not cause death or serious physical harm,
but would have a direct and immediate impact on the safety and health of employees.

On Jan. 19, 2001, OSHA cited Saw Pipes for allegedly failing to properly document
recordable injuries and illnesses over the past three years and proposed penalties of
$536,000. That inspection began July 2000. 

The company manufactures large diameter carbon steel pipes mainly for the oil and gas
transmission industry and employs about 112 workers.

The company has 15 working days from receipt of the citations to comply, request and
participate in an informal conference with the OSHA Houston North area director, or
contest the citations and penalties before the independent Occupational Safety and
Health Review Commission.

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Region 4 News Release: USDOL: 01-10
Mon., Jan. 22, 2001
Contact: Lawrence J. Falck, III
Phone: (813) 626-1177, ext. 0

OSHA FINES FLORIDA SUB-CONTRACTOR NEARLY $230,000 FOR SCAFFOLD SAFETY
VIOLATIONS

The U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration has cited
Austin Builders, Inc., and proposed penalties totaling $229,250 for safety violations found
at a Lithia, Fla., construction site.

"The owner of this company demonstrated a total disregard for the safety of his
employees," said Lawrence J. Falck, OSHA's Tampa area director. " An OSHA compliance
officer, driving by the construction site, observed workers 18 to 30 feet above the
ground on scaffolds without guard rails. A safety inspection was conducted immediately
because of OSHA's fall prevention emphasis program."

The July 5 inspection revealed other safety violations as well. OSHA cited the company
for three willful violations with proposed penalties totaling $210,000 for allowing
employees:
  • to work on scaffolds erected over unstable mudsills with open holes beneath;
    (Mudsills – generally large pieces of lumber placed under the scaffold legs – serve
    as the foundation and prevent sinking. When holes are allowed to develop under
    the mudsills, the scaffolding has no support and may fall.)
  • to climb either a "stair-stepped" masonry block wall or the scaffolding frames to
    reach the platform working level 18 to 30 feet above the ground;
  • to work on the scaffold platform with no guardrails or other means of fall
    protection.

According to Falck, the general contractor had repeatedly warned Austin Builder's owner
about the hazardous conditions and had withheld draw-down funds until hazards were
abated. But the sub-contractor kept reverting to unsafe practices and was fired shortly
after the OSHA inspection. Prior to the OSHA inspection, a Hillsborough County building
inspector advised the sub-contractor about unsafe practices and cited the company for
improper construction methods.

OSHA also cited Austin Builders, Inc., for five serious safety violations with proposed
penalties totaling $19,250 for: exposing employees to the risk of impalement on
unguarded rebars beneath the scaffold; allowing employees to work on scaffolds without
cross bracing; not protecting employees working under the scaffold from falling objects,
such as tools and material; not properly restraining scaffolds so they would not tip over;
and, not training employees to recognize and avoid safety hazards at the job site.

Falck said the agency will work with employers who show a genuine concern for the
welfare of workers. In 1999 OSHA launched the CARE program – Construction Accident
Reduction Emphasis – with a series of extensive outreach training programs for the
construction industry. Encouraged by the industry's positive response to that program, in
May 2000 the agency initiated another local emphasis program targeted to reduce falls, a
major cause of worker injuries and fatalities. 

OSHA defines a willful violation as one committed with an intentional disregard of, or plain
indifference to, the requirements of the OSH Act and regulations.

OSHA defines a serious violation as one in which there is substantial probability that
death or serious physical harm could result and that the employer knew or should have
known of the hazard.

Inspection of the worksite was conducted by OSHA's area office located at 5807
Breckenridge Parkway, Suite A, Tampa, Fla., 33610-4249; telephone: (813) 626-1177.


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Region 3 News Release: III-01-01-22-007-PA
Mon., Jan. 22, 2001
Contact: Leni Uddyback-Fortson
PHONE: OFFICE: (215) 861-5102

OSHA CITES DENVER, PA COMPANY FOR ALLEGED SAFETY & HEALTH
VIOLATIONS; MORE THAN $230,000 PROPOSED IN PENALTIES

The U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration has cited
Acme Lancaster Distribution Center, Denver, Pa, for alleged safety and health
violations, proposing a total of $232,000 in penalties. The company operates a
warehouse distribution center that ships products to Acme/Alberton's grocery stores, and
employs 970 workers at its Denver, Pa. site.

OSHA initiated its inspection on July 16, 2000 in response to a complaint. According to
Bob Fink, area director of the Harrisburg OSHA office, the company was cited for four
willful violations, which carry a proposed penalty of $170,000; one repeat violation with a
proposed penalty of $12,500; 20 serious violations, with a proposed penalty of $48,500;
and seven other-than-serious violations, with a proposed penalty of $1,000.

The willful violations are due to deficiencies in the company's process safety
management program, involving its ammonia refrigeration system. Ammonia can be
extremely hazardous if inadvertently released and may cause severe respiratory disorders
and death.

The repeat violation is due to a lack of company forklift training for workers. The serious
violations include:
  • several additional deficiencies regarding the operation of the ammonia refrigeration
    system
  • lack of an emergency response plan for potential ammonia leaks
  • lack of first aid responders
  • fire extinguisher violations
  • confined space entry program deficiencies
  • lack of fall protection and safety shoes
  • improper storage and handling of materials
  • company's failure to train employees on chemical hazards and precautions 

Other-than-serious violations address:

  • forklift deficiencies
  • deficiencies in company respirator program
  • lock out/tag out program deficiencies
  • record keeping deficiencies 

"Acme Lancaster Distribution Center has disregarded employees' safety and health by not
developing an adequate Process Safety Management program for its ammonia
refrigeration system," says Fink. "Employees were not sufficiently trained on the safe
operation of the system, or on what to do in the event of a catastrophic ammonia
release."

Willful violations are those committed with an intentional disregard of, or plain indifference
to, the requirements of the Occupational Safety and Health Act. A serious violation
involves a substantial probability that death or serious physical harm could result and that
the employer knew or should have known of the hazard.

The company has 15 working days from receipt of the citations to decide to comply,
request an informal conference with the OSHA area director or to contest the citations
and proposed penalties before the Independent Occupational Safety and Heath Review
Commission.

The inspection was conducted by the Harrisburg area office, Progress Plaza, 49 North
Progress Avenue, Harrisburg, Pa. 17109-3596, telephone: (717) 782-3902.


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TRADE NEWS RELEASE
Friday, January 19, 2001
Contact: Bill Wright
Phone: (202) 693-1999

OSHA CITES TEXAS PIPE MANUFACTURER FOR RECORDKEEPING VIOLATIONS;
PROPOSES PENALTIES OF MORE THAN $500,000


Failure to properly document recordable injuries and illnesses over the past three years
has resulted in a $536,000 proposed penalty for a Texas pipe manufacturer, the
Occupational Safety and Health Administration announced today.

Saw Pipes USA, Inc. was cited for 67 alleged willful violations of the recordkeeping rule at
its Baytown, Tex. facility. The citations and proposed penalties represent one of the
largest cases of recordkeeping violations over the last decade.

"Accurate records help reduce injuries and illnesses by helping an employer to pinpoint the
hazards that cause them in the first place," said OSHA Administrator Charles N. Jeffress.
"When an employer fails to keep proper records, or simply neglects the responsibility
altogether, then he or she has placed employees at risk. That is precisely what Saw Pipes
has done in this case, and it cannot be tolerated."

OSHA began its inspection of the facility in July 2000. An initial inquiry revealed numerous
problems with the company's injury and illness logs and resulted in a detailed probe of the
company's recordkeeping procedures, including their OSHA logs between 1998-2000.
Employers with more than 10 workers must maintain records of workplace injuries and
illnesses to help track and improve management of safety and health hazards.

Based on that inspection, OSHA issued 66 alleged willful instance-by-instance violations
for failure to record each work-related injury and illness. A total of $528,000 in proposed
penalties was assessed. One additional willful violation, with a proposed penalty of
$8,000, was issued for 16 instances where the employer failed to correctly record
work-related injuries and illnesses.

"This case comes on the very day OSHA issued its revised recordkeeping rule," Jeffress
said. "Proper recordkeeping is not only a critical component of an employer's total safety
and health effort, but it also helps OSHA identify high-hazard industries and worksites and
aids in helping determine where regulatory efforts should be directed. It is essential that
records be properly kept."

Saw Pipes USA, Inc. employs 112 workers and manufacturers large carbon steel pipes,
used mainly for oil and gas transmission.

A willful violation is defined as one committed with an intentional disregard of or plain
indifference to the requirements of the Occupational Safety and Health Act and
regulations. 

Saw Pipes USA, Inc. has 15 working days to contest the citations and proposed penalties
before the independent Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission.

(NOTE: The last major recordkeeping enforcement case involved U.S. Denro Steel, Inc.,
(doing business as Jindal United Steel Corporation), a steel manufacturer also located in
Baytown, Tex. The company was cited by OSHA on Oct. 20, 2000 for 122 willful
instance-by-instance violations of the recordkeeping rule and assessed penalties of
$1,098,000).

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Region 4 News Release: USDOL: 01-08
Thurs., Jan. 18, 2001
Contact: Les Grove
Phone: (803) 765-5904

OSHA FINES SHIPTECH AMERICA $31,000 FOLLOWING FATAL ACCIDENT AT NORTH
CHARLESTON SHIPYARD

The U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration has cited
Shiptech America, LLC, and proposed penalties totaling $31,150 following a fatal accident
at a North Charleston shipyard.

According to Les Grove, OSHA's Columbia, S.C., area director, a Shiptech America
employee was electrocuted while troubleshooting an electrical problem in a ship's portal
crane. "This employer failed to ensure that all live equipment parts to which the worker
could be exposed were de-energized," said Grove. "If safety-related work practices had
been in place to protect the employee from electrical hazards, this tragedy could have
been prevented."

OSHA's inspection of the company, which maintains and repairs all equipment at the
Detyens Shipyard, resulted in citations for nine serious violations of safety standards,
most of which dealt with electrical hazards. The serious violations included:
  • failure to de-energize live parts before employees worked on them;
  • not requiring and providing personal protective equipment for employees exposed to
    potential electrical hazards;
  • failing to train employees about electrical safety work practices and proper
    protective equipment;
  • live electrical wires allowed to protrude from uncovered receptacles;
  • not providing standard railing on the open side of a stair platform, and
  • no emergency eyewash station in the battery charging room.

OSHA defines a serious violation as one in which there is substantial probability that
death or serious physical harm could result and that the employer knew or should have
known of the hazard.

Shiptech America employs about 45 workers at the North Charleston shipyard. The
company has 15 working days to contest OSHA's citations and proposed penalties before
the independent Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission.

Inspection of the worksite was conducted by OSHA's area office located at the Strom
Thurmond Federal Building, 1835 Assembly St., Room 1468, Columbia, S.C. 29201-2453;
telephone: (803) 765-5904.


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Region 1 News Release: BOS 2001-009
Tuesday, January 16, 2001
Contact: John M. Chavez
PHONE: (617) 565-2075

OSHA CITES BIDDEFORD, MAINE, EMPLOYER FOR ALLEGED WORKPLACE SAFETY
VIOLATIONS; PROPOSES $108,000 IN PENALTIES AGAINST INTERSTATE BRANDS
CORP.


The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) of the U.S. Department of
Labor has cited Interstate Brands Corporation of Biddeford, Maine, for alleged
serious, repeat and other violations of the Occupational Safety and Health Act, and has
proposed penalties totaling $108,000 for those alleged violations.

According to C. William Freeman, OSHA area director for Maine, his office began an
inspection of the company's facilities on September 8, 2000, in response to a formal
complaint filed by the union representing the company's employees. The company
produces bakery products such as bread, rolls, donuts and pies under the brand names of
Nissen, Hostess and Wonder.

Freeman noted that the inspection revealed a number of hazards in the plant, ranging
from open-sided floors and unguarded floor holes, to unguarded machinery and serious
deficiencies in the control of hazardous energy.

Consequently, the company is being cited for the following alleged workplace safety
violations:

Fifteen alleged SERIOUS violations, carrying proposed penalties totaling $58,000
for: 

  • unguarded floor holes, open sided floors or platforms and runways, open sided
    runways or platforms above dangerous equipment also not guarded by standard
    railings, 
  • failure to develop specific procedures for shutting down, isolating and
    securing equipment to be locked out, 
  • failure to provide adequate training in the purpose, function and use of lock-out/tag-out procedures, and
  • failure to certify employee training in these procedures, 
  • unguarded rotating parts on lathes, unguarded bandsaw blade, unguarded rotating horizontal and vertical shafts, 
  • shaft ends extended too far, 
  • unguarded couplings, unguarded chains and belt drives,
  • horizontal mixer not equipped with a cover over the bowl at all times agitator was in
    motion, 
  • undersides of conveyors over aisle ways were not enclosed, 
  • employees exposed to live electrical parts and bulbs not protected from breakage. 

Two alleged REPEAT violations, including proposed penalties totaling $50,000 for:

  • failure to perform and certify periodic inspections of the hazardous energy control
    procedure, and 
  • failure to utilize a procedure affording employees with a level of protection equal to that provided by a personal lockout device when servicing of equipment was performed by a crew of workers. [The company was previously cited for similar violations in citations issued on March 16, 1998.]

Two alleged other-than-serious violations with no proposed penalties for: 

  • a brake not properly set on a powered industrial vehicle and 
  • a missing nameplate on an
    electric motor.

A serious violation is defined by OSHA as one in which there is substantial probability that
death or serious physical harm could result, and the employer knew, or should have
known, of the hazard. A repeat violation is defined as one where, upon reinspection, a
substantially similar violation is found. An other-than-serious violation is a condition which
would probably not cause death or serious physical harm, but would have a direct and
immediate impact on the safety and health of employees.

Noting that Interstate Brands employs 620 workers at its Biddeford facility and more than
34,000 employees nationwide, Freeman said: "This is a big employer with lots of previous
OSHA history. The company is well aware of the safety and health standards which apply
to its operations and is more than aware of the precautions it should be taking to protect
its workers. There is simply no excuse for the hazards we found in this facility."

Freeman urged Maine employers and employees with questions regarding safety and
health standards to contact either of the OSHA offices in Augusta or Bangor. He added
that OSHA's toll-free nationwide hotline -- 1-800-321-OSHA (1-800-321-6742) -- may be
used to report workplace accidents and fatalities or situations posing imminent danger to
workers, especially those situations which occur outside of normal business hours.

OSHA is empowered by the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 to issue
standards and rules requiring employers to provide their employees with safe and healthful
workplaces and jobsites, and to assure through workplace inspections that those
standards are followed.

The company has 15 working days from receipt of the citations and proposed penalties to
either elect to comply with them, request and participate in an informal conference with
the OSHA area director, or contest them before the independent Occupational Safety and
Health Review Commission.


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Region 1 News Release: BOS 2001-007
Tuesday, January 9, 2001
Contact: Ted Fitzgerald
Phone: (617) 565-2074

OSHA PROPOSES $133,000 IN FINES AGAINST BANGOR &
AROOSTOOK RAILROAD FOR 48 REPEAT, SERIOUS AND OTHER
SAFETY VIOLATIONS AT ITS DERBY, MAINE, MAINTENANCE FACILITY

The U.S. Labor Department's Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has
cited the Bangor & Aroostook Railroad for 48 alleged Serious, Repeat and Other than
Serious violations of the Occupational Safety and Health Act at its Derby, Maine,
maintenance facility. OSHA has proposed penalties against the railroad totaling $133,000.

According to C. William Freeman III, OSHA area director for Maine, the alleged violations
were discovered during an inspection initiated on July 11, 2000, in response to a formal
complaint from employees at the facility and encompass a cross-section of safety
hazards involving exposed live electrical parts, failure to deenergize an electrical circuit
before performing maintenance, unguarded moving machine parts, defects involving a
crane, lifting hooks and lifting slings, unprotected LPG tanks, unsafe welding practices,
improperly modified forklift trucks, the accumulation of water and oil in welding pits, lack
of fall protection and inadequate fire safeguards.

"Left uncorrected, the cited conditions expose these workers to the dangers of fire,
explosions, electrocution, falls, slips, trips, being struck by falling materials or by moving
cranes and forklifts, as well as being injured by or caught in moving machine parts," said
Freeman. "There is nothing exotic or arcane about these hazards. They can and should
be addressed by employer adherence to basic, commonsense and legally required
safeguards."

Specifically, the citations and proposed penalties encompass:

Thirty-two alleged Serious violations, accounting for $95,500 in proposed fines, for:

  • numerous instances of unguarded or inadequately guarded moving machine parts,
    including unguarded shafts, pulleys, chop saw, radial arm saw blades, bandsaw
    drive wheels, bandsaw spindle and nut, portable hand grinder, and improperly
    adjusted work rests on bench grinders; forging machines had not received safety
    checks;
  • LPG tanks not protected from vehicular traffic, stored on combustible wooden
    blocks and stored over or near ignitable bushes, dry leaves and trees;
  • blocked access to fire extinguishers or extinguisher locations not marked; fire
    extinguishers not visually inspected monthly;
  • combustible materials not moved, protected or shielded during welding operations;
    fire extinguisher not readily available during welding; no protective equipment to
    prevent welding flashback; low pressure manifold system not posted with a sign to
    prevent attachment of high pressure cylinders; readily accessible shut off valves
    not provided for propane and oxygen lines; electrode holder with welding rod draped
    over metal jack stand;
  • ground fault alarm turned off; metal fixtures stored adjacent to exposed live parts
    in an electrical distribution unit; exposed live parts on grinder switches; reversed
    polarity on an electrical outlet; ungrounded electrical equipment; branch circuit not
    deenergized prior to replacing an electric receptacle;
  • overhead crane not equipped with a warning alarm or rail sweeps;
  • lifting rings that had been welded were not tested; a lifting hook was spread more
    than 30% of its original opening; lifting capacity not marked on chain slings; frayed
    web sling not removed from service;
  • fall protection not used where required;
  • uncapped steel rebar;
  • asbestos waste not identified; entrance to asbestos-containing boiler room lacked
    a warning sign; floor surfaces not maintained free of asbestos;
  • exit doors not marked as such;
  • no mechanical means to measure air flow in a paint booth;
  • excess pressure for a compressed air hose used for cleaning.

Three alleged Repeat violations, with $37,500 in proposed penalties for :

  • bench grinders lacked guards or were improperly adjusted;
  • forklifts were modified without manufacturer's approval;
  • floors not maintained in a dry condition.

[The railroad had previously been cited for substantially similar hazards in citations
issued in November 1998, following a prior inspection at this location and in May
2000, following an inspection at the railroad's Northern Maine Junction facility].

Thirteen alleged Other than Serious violations for:

  • OSHA 200 illness and injury log not maintained; 
  • missing midrail on a work platform;
  • hard hats not provided where needed; 
  • hoists not marked with safety signs; 
  • no written lockout/tagout procedures; 
  • welding curtains or eye protection not provided for employees working adjacent to welding operations;
  • welding cord with exposed conductor and damaged insulation not replaced; 
  • exposed copper wires on arc welder's ground clamp lead; 
  • frayed power cords; 
  • power cord poorly spliced and wrapped with tape; 
  • missing knockouts on electrical panels; 
  • no strain relief for power cords; 
  • unlabeled containers of chemicals.

The Bangor & Aroostook Railroad is headquartered in Northern Maine Junction, Maine.
About 45 workers are employed at the maintenance facility which is located on B&A
Avenue in Derby.

Freeman urged Maine employers and employees with questions regarding workplace safety
and health standards to contact the OSHA offices in Bangor or Portland and added that
OSHA's toll-free, nationwide hotline -- 1-800-321-OSHA (1-800-321-6742) -- may be
used to report workplace accidents or fatalities or situations posing imminent danger to
workers, especially if they occur outside of normal business hours.

A serious violation is defined by OSHA as one in which there is a substantial probability
that death or serious physical harm could result, and the employer knew, or should have
known, of the hazard. An other-than-serious violation is a condition which would probably
not cause death or serious physical harm but would have a direct and immediate
relationship to the safety and health of employees. A repeated violation is issued when a
substantially similar violation has been cited during a previous OSHA inspection and that
citation has become final.

OSHA is empowered by the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 to issue
standards and rules requiring employers to provide their employees with safe and healthful
workplaces and jobsites, and to assure through workplace inspections that those
standards are followed.

The company has 15 working days from receipt of the citations and proposed penalties to
either elect to comply with them, to request and participate in an informal conference
with the OSHA area director, or to contest them before the independent Occupational
Safety and Health Review Commission.


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